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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #1  
Old 03-15-2014, 2:12 PM
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jerhyn jerhyn is offline
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Default Best canned food for storage?

In terms of nutritional value and taste. You don't want to get bored, so variety is important. So is shelf life. Most canned foods are pre-cooked.

Bonus points if it doesn't need a can opener or if it tastes good cold. Taste can be subjective though.

Soups may last a long time, but doesn't always offer a lot nutritionally.

To start it off, I was thinking of

Campbells Spaghettios
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1.0 cup (252 g)
Servings Per Container 2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 170 Calories from Fat 10
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1 g 2%
Saturated Fat 0.5 g 3%
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 600 mg 25%
Potassium 450 mg 13%
Total Carbohydrate 35 g 12%
Dietary Fiber 3 g 12%
Sugars 9 g
Protein 6 g
Vitamin A 10%
Vitamin C 4%
Calcium 15%
Iron 20%
Copper —
Folic Acid —
Iodine —
Magnesium —
Niacin 15%
Phosphorus —
Riboflavin 15%
Thiamin 10%
Vitamin B12 —
Vitamin B6 —
Vitamin D 20%
Vitamin E —
Zinc —
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your

-----------------------------------------------

Ravioli from Chef Boyardee
Beef Ravioli, 15 oz
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 cup (246g)
Servings Per Container about 2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 220Calories from Fat 60
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 2.5g 13%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 10mg 3%
Sodium 750mg 31%
Potassium 870mg 25%
Total Carbohydrate 31g 10%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 7g
Vitamin A 4%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 2%
Iron 10%
Folic Acid 10%
Selenium 20%
Manganese 10%
Product formulations and packaging may change. For the most current information regarding a particular product, please refer to the product package.
* Percent Daily Values (DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
UPC: 6414404315
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Old 03-15-2014, 2:53 PM
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I buy a lot of canned foods and use them regularly. That is a large part of my prep. Canned food I usually eat. I wont waste my money on 'prep items' I wouldnt normally eat. I dont own any MRE's for that reason.

I have at least 3 months worth of food. Not enough meat that isnt frozen however....

Canned doesnt have that great of a recommended shelf life, but I go through it on a regular basis, and rarely find an old can.. I found a can of corn that got pushed to the back of the cupboard beyond expiration... It rarely happens in my house..

I have:
several kinds soups and beef/chicken broth.
Canned chicken/tuna
spaghetti sauce
Chili
misc veggies/tomato and corn
pineapple/fruit cocktail

I also have plenty of rice and pasta for the soups and sauces

A number of ramen/cup of soup- which is bulky so I dont have a lot of it. Also dont care for it too much, so I dont stock a lot...

My biggest suggestion, is to stock up on canned foods you would normally eat.

The only downsides of canned:
relatively short "best by" date.
In a flood, the labels will fall off (I hear people writing expiration and contents on the lid because of this)
Really heavy- not very portable if you bug out.

As to pull tab lids.... convenient for sure... but I have a lot of manual can openers laying around.

Bonuses of canned:
Flood wont hurt the contents.
Wont break if falls off shelf from earthquake.
WIDE selection of foods.
Many are canned in water or juice which helps your fluid intake/water supply.
Easy to heat the contents in the can itself if a heat source is available.
Comes in it's own handy container to eat out of.
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Old 03-15-2014, 3:00 PM
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I'm really interested in the other thread "vacuum packed meat in freezer" where user "Problem Child" discusses home pressure canning meat.

It has me researching the topic.

It would be MUCH cheaper than buying canned meats.

The only downside, is... it's done in "jelly jars" which can break as opposed to a metal can. (Not that it should be much issue if you plan for a quake... just pointing it out)

Also, with a pressure canner, you can make a lot of things just how you like them, and can it.

---
edit----
Dont discount the value of soups.
1 for variety, 2 for the water content.
I dont know any kids that eat cheerios every single day. And both the spaghettios and ravioli are VERY high in salt. I always buy the "low sodium" versions of anything. Those 2 also seem low on calories... though honestly I havent looked at calorie content of most canned items.

Last edited by postal; 03-15-2014 at 3:17 PM..
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Old 03-15-2014, 5:08 PM
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http://www.keystonemeats.com/home/index.php
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Old 03-15-2014, 5:30 PM
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Thanks Gem, that looks like a really good price for canned meats. Going to get some of that for sure.
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Old 03-15-2014, 5:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerhyn View Post
In terms of nutritional value and taste. You don't want to get bored, so variety is important. So is shelf life. Most canned foods are pre-cooked.

Bonus points if it doesn't need a can opener or if it tastes good cold. Taste can be subjective though.

Soups may last a long time, but doesn't always offer a lot nutritionally.

To start it off, I was thinking of

Campbells Spaghettios
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1.0 cup (252 g)
Servings Per Container 2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 170 Calories from Fat 10
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1 g 2%
Saturated Fat 0.5 g 3%
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 600 mg 25%
Potassium 450 mg 13%
Total Carbohydrate 35 g 12%
Dietary Fiber 3 g 12%
Sugars 9 g
Protein 6 g
Vitamin A 10%
Vitamin C 4%
Calcium 15%
Iron 20%
Copper —
Folic Acid —
Iodine —
Magnesium —
Niacin 15%
Phosphorus —
Riboflavin 15%
Thiamin 10%
Vitamin B12 —
Vitamin B6 —
Vitamin D 20%
Vitamin E —
Zinc —
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your

-----------------------------------------------

Ravioli from Chef Boyardee
Beef Ravioli, 15 oz
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 cup (246g)
Servings Per Container about 2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 220Calories from Fat 60
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 11%
Saturated Fat 2.5g 13%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 10mg 3%
Sodium 750mg 31%
Potassium 870mg 25%
Total Carbohydrate 31g 10%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 5g
Protein 7g
Vitamin A 4%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 2%
Iron 10%
Folic Acid 10%
Selenium 20%
Manganese 10%
Product formulations and packaging may change. For the most current information regarding a particular product, please refer to the product package.
* Percent Daily Values (DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
UPC: 6414404315
Sodium levels on canned foods are often lethal. Too bad.
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Old 03-15-2014, 5:55 PM
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There are a lot of options for canned food. The expiration, or best buy date, really means nothing and the food will be safe to eat long after that date has passed. The Hormel website used to say that their canned foods has an indefinite shelf life if unopened. Couldn't find the exact quote on the website when I looked- This is what I found now-
"The product is always safe to consume as long as the seal has remained intact, unbroken and securely attached. However, the flavor and freshness of the product gradually begin to decline after three years from the manufacturing date."

As you look into food storage, you will find plenty of info to tell you that the food will still be safe and nutritious. After many years, canned food may lose color or taste, but will be safe to eat. Obviously, you don't want to eat food from cans that are bulging or smell abnormal when you open them.

Best advice is to stock what you eat. No need having a bunch of food on hand that you don't like and you may end up throwing away. Many great selections of canned food can be purchased at Costco or any of the other big box stores. Costco sells canned chicken, roast beef, tuna, spam in addition to the standard vegetables. Big Lots has many good deals of canned hams, stews, etc as well.

I have a tough time spending money for canned foods hyped by the prepper websites. They're generally more expensive and you have to pay shipping on top of that. The only exception is to get canned foods that are not normally available locally, such as canned butter, cheese, and most importantly- bacon. You can also prep your own long term rice- look on youtube for many how-to videos. Freeze Dried fruits, vegetables, and powdered eggs and milk make a good addition because you likely won't have another way to store these items long term.
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Old 03-15-2014, 6:02 PM
sl0re10 sl0re10 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Excelsior View Post
Sodium levels on canned foods are often lethal. Too bad.
The gov daily recommended limit is so small; 33% of it is actually not very much. For reference; I think the ham slice on an egg McMuffin has 100%...

If there really were a problem... that necessitated breaking out the emergency food... and you had to do any physical work (like walking in the sun for a few hours for a few days) you'd need more salt....

Plus; for people w/o high blood pressure or heart failure... they'll just flush any excess salt out of their body...'too much' is not harmful to them.

But you can also develop a few unpleasant health problems by not eating enough sodium... usually mistaken for (or perceived as) other things... example; the medical community says there seems to be a correlation between beta blockers and psoriasis.... on the other hand; people who take beta blockers also tend to be on low salt diets...

Last edited by sl0re10; 03-15-2014 at 6:13 PM..
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  #9  
Old 03-15-2014, 6:08 PM
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I've kept some boyardee stuff for emergency food. Low price, usually open w/o a can opener.

Also a fan of beans (all kinds including refried).
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Old 03-15-2014, 6:13 PM
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And thats ONLY because regular salt is "iodized" and people need a very small amount of that.....

So, table salt was an easy way to ensure that people got it.

I personally HATE salt. I hate the taste.

I always buy the low sodium or no sodium version of a product if it's available.

That link that Gem provided is very low sodium, and considering the amount of product, is actually a very competitive price. Compare that to 'mountain house' or something else freeze dried that is MEGA SODIUM content.

Though as I said, REALLY interested in home canning.....
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  #11  
Old 03-15-2014, 6:39 PM
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I have a lot of progresso soups, but find we haven't eaten those much lately. Probably not cold enough for use to want soup.

We buy and go through a lot of Costco canned goods.

Chicken - 12-15 cans
Beef - 8-10 cans
Progresso - 12-15 cans
Canned beans - 20-24 cans
Misc stuff corned beef hash, pineapple, mushrooms etc

I find we use the Costco chicken regularly
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  #12  
Old 03-15-2014, 7:08 PM
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We don't keep a lot of soups or canned 'meals' around. We mostly store canned chicken, beef, crab, tuna, baked beans, corn, peas, carrots, green beans, mixed veg, tomatoes, refried beans, and evaporated milk. I do eat Progresso soup on a regular basis though so I should add that to the closet.
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  #13  
Old 03-15-2014, 9:23 PM
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Canned foods are an easy prep. Cans of Chef Boyardee are $1 normally and its easy to stock up with something that requires no heat, no water to cook, and zero preparatory work. Yeah, it's not the healthiest, but for something that you can prepare in minutes, it's nice to have a stash of them.
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Old 03-15-2014, 9:35 PM
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All sorts of canned fruits, pie fillings are good to store. Nothing better than french toast with blueberry pie filling spooned over it instead of syrup.

Canned turkey and chicken is another that stores well is is good.

Corned beef hash

The 1 lb canned hams are pretty fatty but chopped up in soup is really good.

Canned beans of any type.

All sorts of canned maters are easy.
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Old 03-15-2014, 10:08 PM
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Home canning is the way to go. Twice a week me and the wife cook up a big stew, soup, or roast, and can what we don't use for dinner. I've got everything from beef stew, to hambone porridge, to homemade chili, carnitas, and even pickled veggies from the garden.
We've got a baby coming next month, and a 3 year old now, so some of that prep can be popped open for quick meals when we are both zombified on sleep deprivation, or for the days where we just don't feel like cooking.
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Old 03-15-2014, 10:25 PM
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nalley chilly

you can mix it with rice and potatos

vienna sausanges are great too

also the canned chicken from walmart is great
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:13 AM
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Spam! Yeah, fried w/eggs and potatoes---the stuff will probably last FOREVER---other canned goods; chili, beef stew, pastas, fruits, etc...
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:43 AM
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Canned food is not really safe to store for extended periods of time.

You might end up giving yourself a case of botulism.

You're better off storing rice, pasta, barley, oats, and wheat.

Just add a few jars of vitamin pills to your stash with it.

Don't forget you will also need salt, either iodized or sea salt.

And protein of some sort. If you store tuna and sardines, you can feed this to your dogs and cats if you don't end up needing it.
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
All sorts of canned fruits, pie fillings are good to store. Nothing better than french toast with blueberry pie filling spooned over it instead of syrup.

Canned turkey and chicken is another that stores well is is good.

Corned beef hash

The 1 lb canned hams are pretty fatty but chopped up in soup is really good.

Canned beans of any type.

All sorts of canned maters are easy.
It is a lot safer to store dried fruits than canned.
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Old 03-16-2014, 3:01 AM
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I just rotated some of my canned food prep, I felt like a little kid on Christmas morning. I pulled out 10-15 cans of each to be eaten, tomato pasta sauce, tuna fish, corn beef hash, pears, peaches, triple cherry fruit mix, green beans, corn, honey baked beans, pork and beans, chili, beans, yellow mustard, mayo, bbq sauce and a large thing of garlic powder. I think I bought most of that stuff at least 3 years ago. My kids really like fruit so I've made a point to stock a ton of canned and dried fruit. I store most of my bulk stuff like rice, flour, sugar and more sugar in vacuum sealed Mylar bags, inside food grade buckets.
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Old 03-16-2014, 7:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hks95134 View Post
Canned food is not really safe to store for extended periods of time.

You might end up giving yourself a case of botulism.

You're better off storing rice, pasta, barley, oats, and wheat.

Just add a few jars of vitamin pills to your stash with it.

Don't forget you will also need salt, either iodized or sea salt.

And protein of some sort. If you store tuna and sardines, you can feed this to your dogs and cats if you don't end up needing it.
Nope, you don't have a clue. Nothing safer than canned food.

We even store our grains in cans.

Site your sources that says canned goods are not safe.
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Old 03-16-2014, 7:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hks95134 View Post
It is a lot safer to store dried fruits than canned.
Even vacuum packed dried fruit won't last as long as canned fruit. BS
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Old 03-16-2014, 7:29 AM
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Tuna snacks with fruit/crackers
taste greAT, tuna is in can and doesn't need special tools to open
frankly any canned food is good, and will keep for a long time,
usually longer than the user wants it for,
just get variety

PS Canned food may last longer than dried fruit,
but then again I have never heard of dried fruit growing botulism,
as canned foods can do

N
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Old 03-16-2014, 9:56 AM
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Is their a somewhat "safe" date for canned store bought food? Like soup, chili or tuna.
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Old 03-16-2014, 10:20 AM
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What about beans? Lots of nutrients and liquids in canned beans. Refried, black, kidney. I live in a major metropolis so I'm probably going to bug down if there's an earthquake. A big problem I have is fuel, I don't live near a lot of trees and don't want to use up all my propane boiling beans.

I also believe in stocking up on what you eat and rotate it. Basically I always keep my stash full. After I hit costco I put the new case in the stash and pull the oldest one out. Also keeps me from throwing out old food or eating canned items that aren't as fresh. Same goes for vitamins and Meds.

I always wonder about the MRE crowd. I never change my routine on race day. Always go with items you're familiar with. If you end up with gastronomy-intestinal issues you're screwed. If your kids won't eat it you're screwed. If it doesn't cook up properly, you miss out on a lot of the nutrition. I've seen abdominal cramps put people on the ground in the fetal position.

Not saying it's bad, just wondering how many have lived off mountain house for a week or more. I know military guys have done mre's but not all have for very long. I know me and mine will be good because it's all stuff we regularly eat. That aside, my bags of beans and rice alone will keep us going several weeks. When I throw those out to refresh I don't feel bad. Peace of mind costs money in my opinion but it doesn't have to cost a lot.
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Old 03-16-2014, 10:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by optimus-primer View Post
Is their a somewhat "safe" date for canned store bought food? Like soup, chili or tuna.
Properly canned food will last indefinitely. It's the nature of canning. Botulism or other organisms come from compromised cans or improper canning. They don't just grow in the food because of time. Commercially canned foods are GTG forever. You might lose flavor or nutritional value over LONG periods, but that's it.

There's plenty of data available. Google 'canned food shelf life' and read about 100 year old cans, among other things.

The label is the weak point. If it comes off due to flooding or whatever, then you get to play 'guess what's for dinner'. Write on the top with a Sharpie if you're worried about it.
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Old 03-16-2014, 10:22 AM
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"Best by" date doesn't mean spit. It is just a way to get you to toss your food.

Canned food that is stored in a cool dry place will outlast you.
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:05 PM
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Corned beef hash is one item I have found with a far out "best by" date. 3 years plus. There is also a lower sodium version if you are watching the salt.

My next investment are some of those canned food rotation racks. With that said when I was looking into these rotation systems someone here sent me a article that talked about canned food being good 100 years.

Here is a example.

https://mcalvanyintelligenceadvisor....f-life-studies
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:13 PM
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I need to go buy some canned food.
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:39 PM
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I keep forgetting to stock up on some canned dog food as well. My dogs eat dry food, but mixing in a little bit of wet canned food makes them happy.
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Old 03-16-2014, 2:47 PM
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There have been multiple references to labels on cans getting ruined - my solution to this is to wrap the label with clear packing tape - this will keep the original label on the can, intact, & legible through any senario that I have tested.

For long term stage staples (pasta, beans, dried milk, rice, flour, etc.) Go to the closest LDS (Mormon) cannery. You can buy food from them cheaper than anywhere else I've found, & get cans, lids, labels, & borrow their canning machine.

For things like dried fruits & veggies you can buy a really good food drier at costco and seal the dried food in mylar pouches using an oxygen absorber ( both can be purchased cheap from the LDS cannery)

For rotating food I buy stuff like cans of soup, tuna, green beans, corn, pinapple, and more from Costco & Walmart (just watch the expiration dates - especially at Walmart - look for items that have expiration dates at least a year out). I also home can beans & tomatoes from my garden & chicken & ground beef from Costco.

A couple of my tricks are: instead of storing Manwich & ground beef, make the Manwich & then can it, mix taco seasoning with the ground beef for easier prepped tacos, you can add salt &/ or garlic if you wish (I do), i raw can chicken in buffalo sauce then use it to make buffalo chicken pizza (delish), i also can both sweet & spicy Italian sausage, and I make a sweet & sour chicken with pinapple & can it. You are limited only by your imagination - but do keep acidity in mind - the lower the acidity the longer it needs to be processed at a higher temp to be safe.
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Old 03-16-2014, 3:55 PM
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For those weary of canning with the glass jars and worrying about them breaking.... what I do is put the jars back into the same box they got shipped to me in. They are all divided by cardboard, and once sealed up is protected from all light. Then those cases are stored in a cool closet in the house. I got some beef stew I made last November that's calling my name right now. This thread just motivated me to heat up a jar of it.

Thanks!!!
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Old 03-16-2014, 5:40 PM
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My focus in canned food is protein. (Spam, canned chicken, canned tuna, corned beef, canned roast beef, etc.)
Next is energy, with fat > carbs
(You don't need carbs per se to survive, but carbs do provide energy, and carbs are found in foods that also carry vitamins and minerals. You need fat to survive.)
I don't really count on canned food much for vitamins and minerals, turning to supplements instead. It is great if you have a garden of greens you can turn to.
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Old 03-16-2014, 8:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by postal View Post
And thats ONLY because regular salt is "iodized" and people need a very small amount of that.....

So, table salt was an easy way to ensure that people got it.

I personally HATE salt. I hate the taste.

I always buy the low sodium or no sodium version of a product if it's available.

That link that Gem provided is very low sodium, and considering the amount of product, is actually a very competitive price. Compare that to 'mountain house' or something else freeze dried that is MEGA SODIUM content.

Though as I said, REALLY interested in home canning.....
Feel GOOD that you dislike the taste of salt...

Canned food is FULL of salt because it's dirt cheap, it masks hideous food tastes, its taste appeals to many and it assists in preservation.

Not everyone w/o heart issues simply passes excess sodium, even if they sweat and drink plenty of water so beware.

That said items like canned pineapple and peaches have very little sodium. Something like canned ravioli has staggering amounts for what it is.
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Old 03-16-2014, 8:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
"Best by" date doesn't mean spit. It is just a way to get you to toss your food.

Canned food that is stored in a cool dry place will outlast you.
Canned food that is far out of date is still safe but it does degrade in taste.
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Old 03-16-2014, 11:36 PM
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My current favorites that taste great cold are:
1. Chef Boyardee Overstuffed Italian Sausage Ravioli
2. Trader Joe's Turkey Chili
3. Cambell's Chunky Grilled Chicken and sausage Gumbo
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  #37  
Old 03-17-2014, 12:27 AM
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I buy Spam and Dinty Moore large cans. If society really collapses and you cant buy food anymore and your hungry, you wont care about a 7 year old can of spam and dinty moore.
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Old 03-17-2014, 11:44 AM
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Dinty Moore Beef Stew. I have a few

has pretty much unlimited shelf life according to Hormel, but I would say 7 years would be realistic.
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Old 03-18-2014, 8:33 PM
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My friend and I wanted to be as realistic as possible about playing army when we were 14 in 1969 and found a stash of war surplus c-rations in his grand fathers basement. We camped out in tents with our bb guns and ate the 30+ yr old c-rations. Smoked the cigarrettes, made the instant coffee and used the cardboard TP, did not use the water purification tabs and we're still alive today. Didn't even get a stomach ache. Pork and egg, I'll never forget.
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Old 03-18-2014, 9:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerhyn View Post
I keep forgetting to stock up on some canned dog food as well. My dogs eat dry food, but mixing in a little bit of wet canned food makes them happy.
Exactly! I as well feed my dogs dry kibble, just adding a tablespoon of canned wet food and mixing it transforms their meals. Completely agree.
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