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  #41  
Old 12-03-2013, 9:09 AM
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Well...I pack like a woman. I bring all I can carry to pack into a hunt. From camp I carry a small pack with hunting basic necessities. Otherwise I pack in a full USMC ILBE main pack with all my supplies, food, water with a ILBE Assault Pack for daily hunts.
Camping/Hiking/Hunting:
Pack
Tent,
Sleeping bag,
Sleeping Pad
Stove single or multi burner depending on length of trip.
food,
Water,
First Aid Kit with Quick Clot and 2" ace bandage,
Fuel,
Boots and a secondary pair of shoes.
Socks at least 2 pair medium weight 11"
Buck knife 110 or 112,
Camping Axe or tomahawk SOG,
machete, Gerber,
Binoculars
gloves, glove liners, fingerless gloves, latex gloves
hat,
2 pair jeans,
at least 2 tee shirts,
thermals,
Flannel shirt or two,
Down Jacket,
Light Rain Suit
One Camo hunting outfit
entrenchment tool,
Large Black Plastic trash bags,
Cotton Game bags,
tooth brush and paste,
2 bars of soap,
water purifier
satellite phone or PLB,
Tripod chair
Lantern,
2 flash lights,
headlamp,
Lighter and matches,
Mess Kit,
Hip sack,
knife sharpener,
100' 500lb Para cord,
collapsible fishing pole reel bait, weight and hooks.
Rifle(s)
Handgun(s)
Ammo no more than 20 rounds per firearm,

My pack weighs in at between 30 - 50 pounds depending on length of stay and company. packing out meat is always a challenge.

I leave detailed maps of where I will be hiking, camping and hunting. Like others I call just before losing cell service and right when I get it back.

If I'm with others someone will carry in a 5 gallon plastic bucket with top and maybe some gold prospecting equipment.

Last edited by glockman19; 12-03-2013 at 9:50 AM..
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  #42  
Old 12-03-2013, 9:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glockman19 View Post
Well...I pack like a woman. I bring all I can carry to pack into a hunt. From camp I carry a small pack with hunting basic necessities. Otherwise I pack in a full USMC ILBE main pack with all my supplies, food, water with a ILBE Assault Pack for daily hunts.
Camping/Hiking/Hunting:
Pack
Tent,
Sleeping bag,
Sleeping Pad
Stove single or multi burner depending on length of trip.
food,
Water,
First Aid Kit with Quick Clot and 2" ace bandage,
Fuel,
Boots and a secondary pair of shoes.
Socks at least 2 pair medium weight 11"
Buck knife 110 or 112,
Camping Axe or tomahawk SOG,
machete, Gerber,
Binoculars
gloves, glove liners, fingerless gloves, latex gloves
hat,
2 pair jeans,
at least 2 tee shirts,
thermals
Light Rain Suit
One Camo hunting outfit
entrenchment tool,
Large Black Plastic trash bags,
Cotton Game bags,
tooth brush and paste,
2 bars of soap,
water purifier
satellite phone or PLB,
Tripod chair
Lantern,
2 flash lights,
headlamp,
Lighter and matches,
Mess Kit,
Hip sack,
knife sharpener,
100' 500lb Para cord,
Rifle(s)
Handgun(s)
Ammo no more than 20 rounds per firearm,

My pack weighs in at between 30 - 50 pounds depending on length of stay and company. packing out meat is always a challenge.

I leave detailed maps of where I will be hiking, camping and hunting. Like others I call just before losing cell service and right when I get it back.
That's the kind of hunting I want to do.
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Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
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  #43  
Old 12-03-2013, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by taperxz View Post
My point was more to the fact that the OP starts the thread with bad examples that lead to trouble. (trouble easily avoidable)

Survival skills can be found here http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/f...play.php?f=297


If someone is hiking in to hunt, usually they are doing one of two hunts, A simple day hunt that really doesn't allow you to travel that far from your vehicle or they are packing in. In which case they already have what is needed in their pack. How far can one get in steep rugged terrain on a simple morning/evening hunt? LOL are they running through these areas? Usually a slow simple pace is what is required for hunting or you just may be walking past a buck to try to get somewhere.

I too carry "what i think i need" I just thought that the opening to this thread was a little off kilter for an example of being prepared for something bad.
Totally I agree. I go through an area I hunt that is steep and the dirt is silty and I've tooken a digger. The canyon is steep So I have no cell service. I can picture a night out there in crummy weather which is what I usually hunt. My pack is virtually empty just a few McGeiver Things.
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  #44  
Old 12-03-2013, 10:57 AM
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I agree that the two situations that led to trouble for me were my fault. However, the critics must realize the second situation arose from a short hike, in good weather, in a Park and on trails that were advertised as marked, the type of hike we had done many hundreds of times before without incident. This demonstrates how deadly the situation can turn in what most would consider relatively safe circumstances. To the critics that don't think a small light survival package should be carried think about this. You are hunting alone about 5 miles in from nearest road and you aren't expected back for 4 more days. You are 3 miles from your base camp that has all your supplies, you break an ankle. You have no extra food or water, no pain meds, no first aid kit, no extra thermals, no rain poncho. Bad weather is coming in, you die. Now that is really irresponsible to your loved ones.
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Last edited by Hunt; 12-03-2013 at 11:01 AM..
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  #45  
Old 12-03-2013, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Hunt View Post
I agree that the two situations that led to trouble for me were my fault. However, the critics must realize the second situation arose from a short hike, in good weather, in a Park and on trails that were advertised as marked, the type of hike we had done many hundreds of times before without incident. This demonstrates how deadly the situation can turn in what most would consider relatively safe circumstances. To the critics that don't think a small light survival package should be carried think about this. You are hunting alone about 5 miles in from nearest road and you aren't expected back for 4 more days. You are 3 miles from your base camp that has all your supplies, you break an ankle. You have no extra food or water, no pain meds, no first aid kit, no extra thermals, no rain poncho. Bad weather is coming in, you die. Now that is really irresponsible to your loved ones.
Hunt, i am not trying to be critical of your ideas to be prepared at all. I was just pointing out that the examples you gave were just not great.

I don't think this topic has a blanket statement for it. Hunting alone can be done in many ways.

I guess each person must simply choose what needs to be taken based on that particular hunt in all reality.

Also, what kind of hunting? Duck hunting alone, quail, pheasant, and deer all have different aspects to them. In a duck blind you survival kit would exist of, Hot Coffee, full flask, cigars, and maybe lunch if the hunting weather is good. And of course a first aid kit. We gotta keep our priorities straight here.

Last edited by taperxz; 12-03-2013 at 11:46 AM..
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  #46  
Old 12-03-2013, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by center_x View Post
Howd this become a sticky? Do people really carry all this gear for a lonesome hunt? 90% of these post seem to have excessive gear. This thread should be called SHTF/End of the world while hunting. Just my opinion.
So what do you take with you when you hunt alone, or are you Daniel Boone?
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Last edited by Bruce; 12-03-2013 at 1:20 PM..
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  #47  
Old 12-03-2013, 1:56 PM
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Originally Posted by taperxz View Post
Hunt, i am not trying to be critical of your ideas to be prepared at all. I was just pointing out that the examples you gave were just not great.

I don't think this topic has a blanket statement for it. Hunting alone can be done in many ways.

I guess each person must simply choose what needs to be taken based on that particular hunt in all reality.

Also, what kind of hunting? Duck hunting alone, quail, pheasant, and deer all have different aspects to them. In a duck blind you survival kit would exist of, Hot Coffee, full flask, cigars, and maybe lunch if the hunting weather is good. And of course a first aid kit. We gotta keep our priorities straight here.
I agree completely Taper my two examples are lame but that's reality, what fool would find himself crawling on his belly for hours in brush so thick he can't stand up in black dark thirty pm! taper we are on the same page, there are some great comments here, spot locaters, first aid kits etc. The biggest lesson I have learned solo backpack hunting is have the survival supplies on the person and NEVER get separated from them. My little excursion into the brush was mild. I read a true survival story of Alaska backpackers that were dropped off in the wrong location by an incompetent bush pilot. They got separated from their gear, the backpacks fell down a steep slope and the bears destroyed the gear and ate the food, would have been a very bad result if they didn't find a stocked up trappers cabin. Have the gear and keep it on the person is all I am saying, that is what Daniel Boone would do I bet!
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  #48  
Old 12-03-2013, 4:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by center_x View Post
I guess it is natural selection. Guess that's why I don't rely on 20 pounds of gear to live. "Just my opinion though."
If you are comfortable hunting with less gear than i do, more power to you. I do carry a lot of stuff that I never use. To each their own!
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  #49  
Old 12-03-2013, 5:33 PM
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Bruce, when I'm big game hunting I take the following:

Rifle with ammo or bow
Pistol with ammo
Binocs/range finder
Kuiu gear/danner boots
First aid & snake bit kit
Skinning/gutting blades
Strion flashlight
Green light head lamp
iPhone w/ pre downloaded maps
Water/pop tarts/jerky

I'm not Boone, but I'm comfortable with the outdoors. I feel the above equip i carry will cover most issues that I may come across. I'm not mocking people for being prepared, but several of the post were over the top...

Hunt, please don't think I'm looking down upon you or mocking you about your thread.
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  #50  
Old 12-05-2013, 7:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by center_x View Post
Bruce, when I'm big game hunting I take the following:

Rifle with ammo or bow
Pistol with ammo
Binocs/range finder
Kuiu gear/danner boots
First aid & snake bit kit
Skinning/gutting blades
Strion flashlight
Green light head lamp
iPhone w/ pre downloaded maps
Water/pop tarts/jerky

I'm not Boone, but I'm comfortable with the outdoors. I feel the above equip i carry will cover most issues that I may come across. I'm not mocking people for being prepared, but several of the post were over the top...

Hunt, please don't think I'm looking down upon you or mocking you about your thread.
No arrows?
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  #51  
Old 12-12-2013, 7:32 AM
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I just started hunting last year and all my but two outing have been solo. I always a have these items
*topo map
*Hand held GPS
*cell phone (doesn't always get reception)
*camera
*first aid kit and fire kit
*rain gear
*Paper and writing utensils
*roll of neon pink surveyors ribbon
*2 flash light and 3 knives
*food and water (filter kit)
and this I don't take but I always leave a map with a circle of the area I will be heading in to. I let my wife know when I plan on being back.
Since a lot is new to me I try to not venture to far out of the area I highlighted for my wife just in case.
What do you guys think, first timer so any suggestions are welcomed
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  #52  
Old 12-12-2013, 10:12 AM
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Glock G20 10mm sidearm... always
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  #53  
Old 12-12-2013, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3006Daddy View Post
I just started hunting last year and all my but two outing have been solo. I always a have these items
*topo map
*Hand held GPS
*cell phone (doesn't always get reception)
*camera
*first aid kit and fire kit
*rain gear
*Paper and writing utensils
*roll of neon pink surveyors ribbon
*2 flash light and 3 knives
*food and water (filter kit)
and this I don't take but I always leave a map with a circle of the area I will be heading in to. I let my wife know when I plan on being back.
Since a lot is new to me I try to not venture to far out of the area I highlighted for my wife just in case.
What do you guys think, first timer so any suggestions are welcomed

How much food/water are you bringing???

You should bring 5,000+ calories worth of food and 2 quarts of water. This can be fulfilled with 1 MRE and 2 standard issue military canteens. I say bring that much because if you get "stuck there" for some reason, be it injury, lost, whatever, you have supplies to last the amount of time it would probably take to find/crawl your way out, or until your wife and rescue personnel find you.

I learned long ago to bring twice as many expendable (food & water) & short term use (socks & shirts) supplies as the number of days I plan on being in the field. The food & water was just explained. The shirts & socks are for if you get wet and it's cold.

Water transfers heat faster than anything else I know of, so keeping warm and dry when in the field is essential for proper functioning, let alone when injured or lost.

There are emergency GPS beacons that are as simple as possible to use. You press a button and wait. Done.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0321jarhead View Post
Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
"Use the shiny toys when you have them, but never, ever forget how to do it by hand." --- SGT. David Sillick A. Co. 4-64 AR, 3ID

Everything is METTT-C

Last edited by Mr Blu; 12-12-2013 at 12:51 PM..
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  #54  
Old 12-12-2013, 1:36 PM
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MR BLU

Quote:
How much food/water are you bringing???
I Take two litters of water in my bladder. Food I usually take a couple of PB&J sandwiches a medium size bag of Jerky and a couple of power bars.
Thanks for the heads up on the calories.
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  #55  
Old 12-12-2013, 3:00 PM
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Originally Posted by 3006Daddy View Post
MR BLU



I Take two litters of water in my bladder. Food I usually take a couple of PB&J sandwiches a medium size bag of Jerky and a couple of power bars.
Thanks for the heads up on the calories.
What you're bringing for food is just fine and you're bringing plenty of water. The jerky and power bars are great choices for several reasons.

1) They travel well, as in they don't need special storage and take up very little space.
2) Filled with calories and protein, which are both needed for long term extraneous performance.
3) Easy to snack on while on the move.

I put a large amount of jerky in my mouth when in the field, but I don't eat it right away. Think of tobacco dip, but in reverse. Intake the juices and flavored saliva. It helps the jerky last and keeps you awake when tired.
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Originally Posted by 0321jarhead View Post
Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
"Use the shiny toys when you have them, but never, ever forget how to do it by hand." --- SGT. David Sillick A. Co. 4-64 AR, 3ID

Everything is METTT-C
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  #56  
Old 12-12-2013, 3:32 PM
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Originally Posted by 3006Daddy View Post
I just started hunting last year and all my but two outing have been solo. I always a have these items
*topo map
*Hand held GPS
*cell phone (doesn't always get reception)
*camera
*first aid kit and fire kit
*rain gear
*Paper and writing utensils
*roll of neon pink surveyors ribbon
*2 flash light and 3 knives
*food and water (filter kit)
and this I don't take but I always leave a map with a circle of the area I will be heading in to. I let my wife know when I plan on being back.
Since a lot is new to me I try to not venture to far out of the area I highlighted for my wife just in case.
What do you guys think, first timer so any suggestions are welcomed
While I'm new to this as well, something I've added to my pack which doesn't take up much space or weight are large garbage bags or a 5x7 tarp. Aside from hunting uses, the tarp and bags can make shelter, makeshift ponchos, collect water, etc...
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  #57  
Old 12-12-2013, 3:45 PM
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Here is a list I go from:
Attached Files
File Type: pdf hunting-gear-list.pdf (112.6 KB, 65 views)
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  #58  
Old 12-12-2013, 3:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Blu View Post
How much food/water are you bringing???

You should bring 5,000+ calories worth of food and 2 quarts of water. This can be fulfilled with 1 MRE and 2 standard issue military canteens. I say bring that much because if you get "stuck there" for some reason, be it injury, lost, whatever, you have supplies to last the amount of time it would probably take to find/crawl your way out, or until your wife and rescue personnel find you.

I learned long ago to bring twice as many expendable (food & water) & short term use (socks & shirts) supplies as the number of days I plan on being in the field. The food & water was just explained. The shirts & socks are for if you get wet and it's cold.

Water transfers heat faster than anything else I know of, so keeping warm and dry when in the field is essential for proper functioning, let alone when injured or lost.

There are emergency GPS beacons that are as simple as possible to use. You press a button and wait. Done.
A guy went on a morning hunt in B1 this past season. Fell down a ravine and hurt himself. He was out there for I think 18 days with nothing but his wits and experience. Was found in reasonable condition.
http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php?...est&Itemid=197
If I walk away from the truck I have a small pack with redundant fire making supplies, compass,some energy bars,rope,space blanket, and a few other things I have stuck in there about 8-10 lbs total

Last edited by thomashoward; 12-13-2013 at 10:46 PM..
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  #59  
Old 12-12-2013, 5:09 PM
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Originally Posted by thomashoward View Post
A guy went on a morning hunt in B1 this past season. Fell down a ravine and hurt himself. He was out there for I think 14 days with nothing but his wits and experience. Was found in reasonable condition.

If I walk away from the truck I have a small pack with redundant fire making supplies, compass,some energy bars,rope,space blanket, and a few other things I have stuck in there about 8-10 lbs total
That guy really lucked out. He must have either had water on him or found it because he would have died without it in that time frame, or been damned near close.
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Originally Posted by 0321jarhead View Post
Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
"Use the shiny toys when you have them, but never, ever forget how to do it by hand." --- SGT. David Sillick A. Co. 4-64 AR, 3ID

Everything is METTT-C
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  #60  
Old 12-12-2013, 5:56 PM
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Shoot... I've gone to war with a smaller loadout then some of the lists here. And quickclot? Seriously... no thanks.
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  #61  
Old 12-13-2013, 1:36 PM
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My personal opinion is that some of the lists in here are overkill for the average guy who parks his truck and hunts for a few hours before returning. Going into the woods for the day isn't like backpacking in for 3 weeks. The only reason I'm posting is so those that wonder about if they really need all that stuff to be gone from their truck for 3-4 hours get a balanced answer.
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I've gone to cabelas outfitter pattern for the central coast. Works so good the animals and I never see each other.

224 rounds of high quality Winchester .223 FS/FT

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  #62  
Old 12-13-2013, 2:11 PM
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My personal opinion is that some of the lists in here are overkill for the average guy who parks his truck and hunts for a few hours before returning. Going into the woods for the day isn't like backpacking in for 3 weeks. The only reason I'm posting is so those that wonder about if they really need all that stuff to be gone from their truck for 3-4 hours get a balanced answer.
I agree, people are carrying way too much stuff.
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Old 12-13-2013, 7:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewdogg21 View Post
My personal opinion is that some of the lists in here are overkill for the average guy who parks his truck and hunts for a few hours before returning. Going into the woods for the day isn't like backpacking in for 3 weeks. The only reason I'm posting is so those that wonder about if they really need all that stuff to be gone from their truck for 3-4 hours get a balanced answer.
No one here has described any such thing.

It's all about "have and not need, instead of need and not have" when going out ALONE for more than just a few hours at a time and way further away than 50 yards from your vehicle.

Many of the items listed by me, as well as others, have been chosen because we learned the hard way. You bring certain things to the field because Mr. Murphy likes to **** with those who either choose to not be prepared or think "It's only a few hours. Nothing will happen.". Don't give that ******* a chance. Bring the basics, at least. Water, first aid, a knife, current local maps.

Assuming nothing will go wrong because nothing has yet, is not only stupid, but also a fallacious argument.

Judging by some of the comments here, a 12 year old Boy Scout would probably be more prepared.
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Originally Posted by 0321jarhead View Post
Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
"Use the shiny toys when you have them, but never, ever forget how to do it by hand." --- SGT. David Sillick A. Co. 4-64 AR, 3ID

Everything is METTT-C
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  #64  
Old 12-13-2013, 8:07 PM
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How are you guys packing out your game with all this stuff? A deboned muley is 60 to 75 lbs and will fill up a pack. Or are we talking blacktails or hogs? What kind of packs are you guys running? Would love to see some pics of the setups with a load of meat cape and horns.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Blu View Post
No one here has described any such thing.

It's all about "have and not need, instead of need and not have" when going out ALONE for more than just a few hours at a time and way further away than 50 yards from your vehicle.

Many of the items listed by me, as well as others, have been chosen because we learned the hard way. You bring certain things to the field because Mr. Murphy likes to **** with those who either choose to not be prepared or think "It's only a few hours. Nothing will happen.". Don't give that ******* a chance. Bring the basics, at least. Water, first aid, a knife, current local maps.

Assuming nothing will go wrong because nothing has yet, is not only stupid, but also a fallacious argument.

Judging by some of the comments here, a 12 year old Boy Scout would probably be more prepared.
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  #65  
Old 12-13-2013, 8:47 PM
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How are you guys packing out your game with all this stuff? A deboned muley is 60 to 75 lbs and will fill up a pack. Or are we talking blacktails or hogs? What kind of packs are you guys running? Would love to see some pics of the setups with a load of meat cape and horns.

Believe it or not, food, water, medical supplies, medium weather gear, a poncho, etc. don't take up a lot of space. Remember, this is on the subject of "out for the day, but prepared".

I will upload a pic tomorrow of what I would bring to the field for safety and comfort.
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  #66  
Old 12-13-2013, 8:57 PM
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Old 12-13-2013, 11:08 PM
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Knowledge and practice are both lighter to carry and harder to lose than "stuff".

Quickclot? Yuppers, because it's not just in case you get shot, if you are doing anything high angle it's worthwhile to keep one in the first aid kit if you have the space and can spare the weight.
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Old 12-14-2013, 5:32 AM
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Does that stuff even work? I remember a few years ago hanging out with a combat medic and some military guys and they were talking about it. i thought the consensus was that it was a joke and useless.

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Shoot... I've gone to war with a smaller loadout then some of the lists here. And quickclot? Seriously... no thanks.
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Old 12-14-2013, 6:24 AM
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Does that stuff even work? I remember a few years ago hanging out with a combat medic and some military guys and they were talking about it. i thought the consensus was that it was a joke and useless.
From my medic buddies that have described the effects, I won't use the stuff, the Army stopped issuing it for awhile though because of its effects. As I understand it, it actually burns the individual in an attempt to sort of cauterize the wound then needs to be dug out of your body once you get to real medical treatment. Basically, it causes more harm than good in most circumstances because there are specific types of wounds in specific types of situations where it is the appropriate tool, but very few people actually know how and when to use it.

I'll stick to bandages and tourniquets and old school first aid training. Sure, I'm trained on a bunch of different procedures and equipment, just enough to be dangerous, but there are some things that are tried and true that you never get away from, I'll stick with that stuff.

Last edited by CavTrooper; 12-14-2013 at 6:28 AM..
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Old 12-14-2013, 6:55 AM
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Knowledge and practice are both lighter to carry and harder to lose than "stuff".

Quickclot? Yuppers, because it's not just in case you get shot, if you are doing anything high angle it's worthwhile to keep one in the first aid kit if you have the space and can spare the weight.
Tampons are actually better for bullet wounds.

Every military medic I met carried them. Every civilian medic I met carried them. I carry them.
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Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
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Old 12-14-2013, 7:18 AM
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Old 12-14-2013, 9:57 AM
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Mr.Blu - do you carry tampons for bullet wounds when hunting or are speaking of just when in battle?

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Old 12-14-2013, 10:19 AM
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I believe this thread has gone from hunting solo, to living out in the woods, to prepping for Armageddon, to battlefield first aid.
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Old 12-14-2013, 1:04 PM
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Originally Posted by CavTrooper View Post
From my medic buddies that have described the effects, I won't use the stuff, the Army stopped issuing it for awhile though because of its effects. As I understand it, it actually burns the individual in an attempt to sort of cauterize the wound then needs to be dug out of your body once you get to real medical treatment. Basically, it causes more harm than good in most circumstances because there are specific types of wounds in specific types of situations where it is the appropriate tool, but very few people actually know how and when to use it.

I'll stick to bandages and tourniquets and old school first aid training. Sure, I'm trained on a bunch of different procedures and equipment, just enough to be dangerous, but there are some things that are tried and true that you never get away from, I'll stick with that stuff.
I don't believe it that is true anymore. The older stuff definitely did, I believe the new stuff is more passive.
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Old 12-14-2013, 1:05 PM
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I believe this thread has gone from hunting solo, to living out in the woods, to prepping for Armageddon, to battlefield first aid.
Not many threads on any forum stick the the original topic!
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Old 12-14-2013, 1:28 PM
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Tampons are actually better for bullet wounds.

Every military medic I met carried them. Every civilian medic I met carried them. I carry them.
Veering back to hunting solo, a tip I got from another hunter was that tampons are also useful for a scent drag (spray scent on tampon, use the built in string to tie it to your boot ankle strap or whatever)
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Old 12-14-2013, 5:35 PM
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Mr.Blu - do you carry tampons for bullet wounds when hunting or are speaking of just when in battle?

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Just in general, for the same reason I take my small med pouch with me whenever I get on the road. I have passed to many accidents without it.

Many people use firearms to hunt with. That means there is a small chance they can be shot with their own firearm.

Tampons are also good for large puncture wounds, when the object that did the damage is no longer inside the wound. But if it is, leave it there if at all possible.
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Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
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Old 12-14-2013, 5:35 PM
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Veering back to hunting solo, a tip I got from another hunter was that tampons are also useful for a scent drag (spray scent on tampon, use the built in string to tie it to your boot ankle strap or whatever)
Interesting.
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Originally Posted by 0321jarhead View Post
Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
"Use the shiny toys when you have them, but never, ever forget how to do it by hand." --- SGT. David Sillick A. Co. 4-64 AR, 3ID

Everything is METTT-C
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  #79  
Old 12-14-2013, 5:42 PM
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I believe this thread has gone from hunting solo, to living out in the woods, to prepping for Armageddon, to battlefield first aid.
I don't think so.

To me, it seems like people have simply gotten specific about certain aspects about hunting alone and what to do/bring should something go wrong.

It's about being prepared for some of the most common things to go wrong. Such as getting lost, minor injuries, supplies for long term performance, sudden changes in weather, etc. All of those things can be real problems when not properly prepared for and all of those problems can be easily negated by carrying a small amount of supplies/tools/equipment in a backpack no larger than what a high school kid would use.
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Originally Posted by 0321jarhead View Post
Accuracy is not always the rifle, its the nut behind the stock.
"Use the shiny toys when you have them, but never, ever forget how to do it by hand." --- SGT. David Sillick A. Co. 4-64 AR, 3ID

Everything is METTT-C
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Old 12-20-2013, 6:20 AM
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I've always hunted alone… the two lessons i can give are, 1. if you're walking a trail you've never been on before, don't plan on walking back in the dark. things look totally different backwards and in the dark and game trails look the same as regular trails in the single flashlight beam when you lose that perspective of having enough light to make out footprints and to see into the distance. 2. always bring at least one "warming" piece of emergency gear no matter how short a distance you're going. that's your single biggest lifesaver. you can make it several days without water, but one freezing night without any warmth can injure or kill you that first night. for me that means just bringing a bic lighter or an emergency blanket. once i got lost at night with no jacket or sleeping bag or anything; i kept making fires, spreading out the ashes, putting some dirt over them, and then laying on them. kept me warm enough all night.
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