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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #1  
Old 04-03-2018, 5:21 PM
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Default What would you realistically include in a bug out location?

What would you realistically include in a bug out location?

This is not a citadel (armored fortress) but will be somewhat isolated.

My thoughts include:
  • A home built of sturdy but inflammable materials that works with and without power
  • A well stocked basement supply room
  • An artesian well
  • Ready access to a good fishing stream
  • Orchards and a couple of acres of farmable land
  • Forrested
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Old 04-03-2018, 7:52 PM
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Our plans. 100 acres in N. Idaho. 10 of which pasture. Year round creek and/or artisan spring. Custom built house with basement and out buildings. Variety of farm animals: steer, cows, chickens, sheep and goats. Maybe 2 horses. Variety of fruit trees. We donít plan for much, just want a more free/simple life.
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Old 04-03-2018, 8:27 PM
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Ample water is the most important, followed by tillable land. Those 2 things are at the top.

Land cleared at least 300 yards from your home - defensible space. Steel roof on all buildings. Solar power with battery and Generator backup.

A large root cellar or larder for storing large amounts of food with ample stores of canning and food preserving equipment.

A well appointed shop and supplies to repair or make anything.

Dry goods stores to last 5 or more years.

Weapons and know how to keep it all safe.
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Old 04-03-2018, 8:42 PM
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As I get older I've written off a second property. I bought my parents old place about 4 years before I was going to retire. Arrived one time after rains and not being there for an month and the weeds were 3' high. Cleaned it up and sold it. I'm up in the air even about selling this house on 1/3 acre. I paid $45,000 for it and we have Prop13 (under $1,000 a year tax). If I sold it I'd still need a local CA place - even paying cash I'd end up with 4-600 a month in taxes so that doesn't make sense. Bottom line is we'll shelter in place. If it burns down we'll move into our travel trailer - if it get's real bad we'll hook it up to the 4x4 and move to the desert. We've got 60 days of dried and other food and 20-30 days of survival water in the garage so that'd go with us.
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Old 04-03-2018, 8:48 PM
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All are great things to have on your list. I would add privacy. Your home site should offer an acceptable amount of privacy from public roads as well as neighbors. It's ok to have neighbors, just not in viewing distance ideally .

Water source does not have to be artesian, just reliable year round. Watch out for easements. You don't want a neighbor, the power company or logging company to have rights across your land that would impact how you use it. Read and understand the potential impact of any or all recorded easements on the land.

Speaking of easements, make sure you have legal access to the land. Some parcels can be land locked and depending on the laws of the state you are in, can make legally getting onto you land a problem.
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Old 04-04-2018, 8:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
Ample water is the most important, followed by tillable land. Those 2 things are at the top.

Land cleared at least 300 yards from your home - defensible space. Steel roof on all buildings. Solar power with battery and Generator backup.

A large root cellar or larder for storing large amounts of food with ample stores of canning and food preserving equipment.

A well appointed shop and supplies to repair or make anything.

Dry goods stores to last 5 or more years.

Weapons and know how to keep it all safe.
This is a good list but how many people could "bug out" to a ranch like the one described above and make a go of it? My point is if your not already living at your bug out location and farming/raising livestock you don't have a chance. I don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but be honest with your self. Have you ever ran a tractor let alone plow or cultivate? how about pull a mis-presented calf? these are just the very basics of farm life...
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Old 04-04-2018, 9:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckylogger6 View Post
This is a good list but how many people could "bug out" to a ranch like the one described above and make a go of it? My point is if your not already living at your bug out location and farming/raising livestock you don't have a chance. I don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but be honest with your self. Have you ever ran a tractor let alone plow or cultivate? how about pull a mis-presented calf? these are just the very basics of farm life...
Exactly, didn't we already cover the whole "bugging out" fantasy? Basically, as pointed out above, unless you already live there, you won't be able to GET there (especially from most places in CA). And even if you COULD, the vast vast vast majority of "city people" would not be able to live a self sufficient agrarian life.
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Old 04-04-2018, 11:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckylogger6 View Post
This is a good list but how many people could "bug out" to a ranch like the one described above and make a go of it? My point is if your not already living at your bug out location and farming/raising livestock you don't have a chance. I don't mean to rain on anyone's parade but be honest with your self. Have you ever ran a tractor let alone plow or cultivate? how about pull a mis-presented calf? these are just the very basics of farm life...
That is a great point. The place I described is mine. I have owned it for a long long time. I have 80 acres in Zin grapes and the rest is for livestock.

We are Mormons and have a huge family and it would be a real challenge to live off the land if we didn't have a clue to what we are doing. Its paid for and isn't self supporting.
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Old 04-04-2018, 11:21 AM
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Even with your experience, ranch, and family living, off the land with no more inputs would be a struggle (i think). So for the average person its a pipe dream.

I think this based on my experience trying to run a 15 acre family farm with unlimited access to hardware stores, feed stores, fuel, power, vet, hay, etc.
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Old 04-04-2018, 4:51 PM
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Root cellar would be nice but our water table is so high any holes dug just full with water.

Probably going to semi bury a storage container for the same effect.

Gardening is a year round nonstop struggle against weeds (scotchbroom is relentless) and predation (birds, wayward livestock, deer and elk cause much damage in short order if unchecked).

Farming in general is difficult and dictated by weather.

Having plenty of helping hands is critical.Folk that don't pull their weight drag the whole enterprise down.
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Old 04-04-2018, 4:54 PM
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https://www.atlassurvivalshelters.com/round-culvert
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Old 04-04-2018, 4:56 PM
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Good relations with neighbors is also critical for the long haul. Find out what tools they don't have then get them. I'm the only one with a backhoe and folk are mighty glad I share/barter and they return the favor in kind (I have no haying gear but my neighbors do - trade hay for beef).
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Old 04-04-2018, 6:32 PM
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Stock ponds for trout, bass, ducks, geese.


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Old 04-05-2018, 7:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckylogger6 View Post
Even with your experience, ranch, and family living, off the land with no more inputs would be a struggle (i think). So for the average person its a pipe dream.

I think this based on my experience trying to run a 15 acre family farm with unlimited access to hardware stores, feed stores, fuel, power, vet, hay, etc.
Yep it makes me smile when people think that its easy to ranch or farm. How many here have killed a hog or a beef and and processed it. Killed even a simple chicken and prepared it for the pot. All my children and grand children of age can.

Long term for my clan is durable goods. Shoes, boots, gloves, jackets and the like. Fuel will become a issue after about 3 years if we mind our use. I don't know how to plow with a horse.

Pesticides will become a real issue. Wouldn't take very many bugs to drop production by 50%.
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Old 04-05-2018, 2:49 PM
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Access to the ocean and a kayak. Unlimited food supply. Way easier than farming and keeping animals.
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Old 04-05-2018, 7:26 PM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrTsuvykUZk
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Old 04-05-2018, 7:27 PM
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Everything and:

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