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Survival and Preparations Long and short term survival and 'prepping'.

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  #121  
Old 03-05-2014, 4:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunGreg2107 View Post
I carry in my suv a pretty comprehensive med kit. keep in mind that I am an nremt-paramedic. heres the contents as best as I can remember

bsi/ppe
about 20 sets of nitrile gloves
faceshield
goggles
2 gowns
5 n95 respirators

airway
complete opa set
npa set about 7 sizes with surgilube
endo tube set
laryngo set with blades and spare bulb
a few king airways
some lm airways
3 bulb suction syringe

breathing
1 ped non rebreather mask
1 ped nasal cannula
2 adult cannula
2 adult nrb mask
jumbo d size 02 tank
regulator and spare tank key
adult and ped bvm

bleeding
6 5x9 trauma pads
4 cat
h and h bandages
a few ibd
lots of 4x4 and 2x2 gauze

tools
adult and ped bp cuff
stethoscope
pen lights and small streamlight
tweezers
2 scapels # 10 I believe
curved and straight Kelly hemo
magill forcep
glucometer and lancets and strips

drugs
epi auto
epi multidose
atropine
naloxone
activated charcoal suspension
adenosine
amiodarone
aspirin 325 and 81mg
calcium chlor
dextrose
diphenhydramine
glucagon
lidocaine
mag sulfate
nitro spray and tablets
Zofran iv and tabs
sodium bi carb
vasopressin
verapamil
motrin
Tylenol
oral glucose

iv bag
alcohol preps
iv tube sets
lock ext sets
2 1000ml bags 1 ns 1 lr
misc cath about 10
tourniquets
some 4x4 in here as well

I also keep a pre made ob kit

have some other misc stuff like sutures trauma shears tape

I now feel like I should go take apart my bag and when I do I will add pictures
That is pretty over the top. Geez......NREMTP since 1991.
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  #122  
Old 03-08-2014, 8:36 PM
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Just added a bunch of meds, and some hex
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  #123  
Old 03-11-2014, 6:10 PM
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  #124  
Old 03-18-2014, 3:26 AM
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  #125  
Old 03-23-2014, 1:49 PM
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There is an amazon link here if you want to purchase one. They are about $14 and have free shipping. Which is cheaper than I have seen it in stores.

The case is small and fits perfect in a glove box. Comes with all of the essentials and has some room for expansion. Not a trauma kit, but just good for the common things you would need a first aid kit for. I'll post my trauma one later.

AAA COMMUTER 85 PIECE FIRST AID KIT INCLUDES: First aid instructions, scissors, tweezers, 2 vinyl gloves (1 pair), 1 whistle, 3 sting relief pads,6 antispetic towelettes,14 alcohol prep pads, 1 triangular bandage, 1 5" x 9" combine dressing, 20 3/8" x 1 1/2" bandages, 10 standard adhesive bandages, 10 butterfly bandages, 1 knuckle bandage, 2 knee/elbow bandage, 1 4" x 4" sterile gauze pad, 2 3" x 3" sterile gauze pads, 4 2" x 2" sterile gauze pads, 1 2" gauze roll, 1 adhesive tape, 1 carabineer, 1 sturdy hard shell carry case 6.2 x 7.75 x 2 inches in size. Weighs 0.70. Unique design. Durable hard shell design. 85 pieces. Clear pocket design. Carabineer attached for cliping onto items. Smart usable contents for minor cuts and scrapes. Ideal use for home,travel,outdoor and sports.

Tweezers and scissors aren't great. I added a lighter, some waterproof band-aids, cleaning wipes and ammonia inhalant. I'll post my other more comprehensive first aid kit later.

Last edited by jerhyn; 09-15-2015 at 2:19 PM..
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  #126  
Old 03-23-2014, 5:50 PM
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Hello all,

I have been looking into a first aid kit for my vehicle and home.
I have been looking on Amazon- there are so many at different prices but all I can really read is reviews and don't really trust Amazon reviews.

Can anyone shoot a link or let me know where you can get a legit first aid kit for:

1. Vehicle (I am on the MTN a lot and have a @ bare bones kit but nothing more)
2. Home


Thank you for your consideration.
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  #127  
Old 03-23-2014, 5:53 PM
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  #128  
Old 03-23-2014, 6:18 PM
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Hahaha! Thank you sir! Will include
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  #129  
Old 04-22-2014, 8:19 AM
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I second Lugiahua's statement. TRAINING is your most important asset, along with the ability to think creatively and react appropriately to changing conditions. Those latter two skills grow exponentially with additional training and exposure to challenges.

As a trauma surgeon, all I REALLY need to stop your bleeding -- no matter where it is -- is a way to apply consistent pressure until your body finishes the clotting process. Whether it is ligating a vessel (pressure by squeezing the vessel with a suture) or stopping hemorrhage in a massive slash wound (pressure with gauze and compression wraps), the principle is usually the same. A torn T shirt and a pair of hands can address most situations until more help arrives. Of course, in a SHTF scenario when there won't be any help coming, then more training and a few extra pieces of equipment can make all the difference in the world.

EMT training is a good start, but many people can't swing a semester-long or year-long course on a scheduled basis. WOLS classes or similar offerings are a good bet, too. I'd also recommend that you try volunteering with some local rescue or fire departments, and get involved with their training regimens.

If you're truly serious about optimizing your ability to treat medical emergencies, then volunteer in your local ED. Every hospital I've ever worked in is extremely happy to get any volunteers that they can, and the staff is very appreciative and will teach you whenever there is downtime that allows for a teaching moment. If anyone is serious about it and is in the Sacramento area, PM me. I can set you up at my hospital or refer you to one closer to your home if you prefer.

We could also set up a one or two day course for CalGunners in the Sacramento area if there was enough interest. I'd be happy to share some basic info and lead some practice scenarios, if people wanted it.
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  #130  
Old 04-28-2014, 3:17 PM
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For beginner training, I recommend Wilderness First Responder (WFR) course, it comes in both semester long or ten day acceleration version.
Of course, if you have money and time, a six week long Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician is even better.

In Wilderness Medicine courses students learned to improvise the material they have at hand, instead of rely on commercial products.
And I don't recommend people carry thing beyond their training. It's just waste of money, and potentially harmful to their patients.
(e.g. like someone with only CPR/AED cert carries a set of ET tube and laryngoscope or surgical airway kit)

You can find more about these courses by contacting NOLS, WMA, or SOLO
http://www.nols.edu/wmi/
http://www.soloschools.com/
https://www.wildmed.com/wilderness-medical-courses/

For deeper skill in treating trauma, there are Pre-Hospital Trauma Life (PHTLS) Support and International Trauma Life Support. (ITLS)
They are offered regularly in Bay Area.
http://www.naemt.org/education/PHTLS/phtls.aspx
https://www.itrauma.org/

There is also Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) or other TEMS courses but usually harder to find unless you are affiliated with military or law enforcement.


With proper training, you could assemble or find the medical kit appropriate for your own purpose.

Last edited by Lugiahua; 04-29-2014 at 3:30 PM..
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  #131  
Old 04-28-2014, 4:53 PM
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I have a few of those Adventure medical kits trauma pak's, 1 in each car along with a 10$ first aid kit from target/walmart. From cuts to more serious injuries.
As for a IFAK type on my belt http://www.skdtac.com/HSGI-Improved-...-p/hsg.205.htm

Last edited by Darklyte27; 04-28-2014 at 5:35 PM..
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  #132  
Old 04-29-2014, 12:51 PM
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I have a few of these. I have one in my car in my truck and in my Jeep as well.







I have this as well. I add stuff to it from time to time. mostly band aids and neosporen and some gauze and tape. pretty good container.

I bought an aid bag at a gun show packed full of stuff as well. no photo though.
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  #133  
Old 05-02-2014, 11:10 PM
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I am going to post a few emergency medicine related AAR here...hope these will encourage people attending trainings.


Wilderness First Responder with Ready SF/NOLS, March 21st-30th, 2014. (1/2)


Wilderness medicine is a special branch under emergency medicine, just like tactical medicine. “Urban” emergency medical system is often not appropriate in the back-country setting due to long distance of transportation, difficult terrain, likelihood of infection, and longer patient contact time. In my opinion, wilderness medicine is closer to tactical medicine than to traditional urban system. Wilderness responders also have make evacuation decisions: should this patient stay or leave? If they have to leave, how fast do they need to be evacuated? For the mentioned reasons, it is important to attend wilderness medicine training for those who are interested in both disease prevention and treatment under backcountry setting.



While there are many differences in practice and philosophy of patient care, all current wilderness medicine courses are based on their “urban” counterparts, and students are certified in both areas upon completion of the training. Wilderness First Responder is basically a Medical First Responder with Wilderness update, and Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician is an EMT (regardless level) with Wilderness update. While currently there are several institutions sponsoring wilderness medicine training in the US, National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) for now is the largest and most well-known one. The training I attended this time was organized by Ready SF under NOLS sponsorship. The course runs in the length of ten full days, with the sixth day being a rest day with no class, and two night trainings. Half of the class was conducted outside in the Crissy field near Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, and nearby beach. The class offers 72 hours of CEU(Continued Education Units) for those in the medical field. University of Utah also offers 3 upper division credits with the fee of $300 as an option. Our instructors were Chris and Dave, both are experienced WEMT (Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician) with very professional attitudes.

Each student got a binder and a full size textbook. The class used mainly the binder, but students were encouraged to read the paperback book for additional knowledge. We were also told the NOLS website has many training or educational videos to help us.


(Not the actual schedule)



Day 1:

First day was mostly indoor; we began with paper work, then the introduction of wilderness medicine. We were explained the differences between “urban” and wilderness emergency medicines. We then began the chapters with patient assessment system, which is very similar to my past EMS trainings. Patient assessment is probably the most important skill as an EMS provider: we had to quickly determine if any life threating conditions were present, and to locate additional injuries, symptoms, past history, medication or allergy. It is during this step we make decision if the patients need a rapid evacuation. This skill is the focal point of all EMS training. We also learned about “Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan” (SOAP) report and patient documentation.

Day 2:

In the morning we focused on spine and back injury, and patient immobilization. Unlike urban EMS, full body immobilization is not always practical or appropriate in back country. It is far slower and uncomfortable to move a patient with backboard than with litter or an ambulatory patient. And long back board is rare anyway in the backcountry. We would learn about focus spine assessment in the next morning. In the afternoon, the topic was chest injury and shock. There were two life threating chest injury conditions: flail chest and tension pneumothorax, and neither cannot be treated in the field with BLS (Basic Life Support) skill, thus both require a rapid evacuation. (Tension pneumothorax could be relieved with needle decompression, which is currently still considered as an ALS (Advanced Life Support) skill.)


(A flail chest)

On the other hand, simple rib fracture isn’t life threating, and does not necessarily need a physician care. Shock is basically “poor perfusion in cellular level”, and could be caused by many reasons. The most common one is hypovolemic shock from dehydration due to either disease or simply inadequate fluid intake. Mild shock from dehydration can be managed in the field, but any more severed shock, or those caused by trauma cannot be managed in the field (Not even with ALS skills) and must be evacuated immediately.

(An improvised headblock)

Day 3:

Today we began with focus spine assessment (FSA) and head injury, an important skill in outdoor setting. As stated above, the ability skill to determine if patients can walk out on their own may tremendously reduce the resource required in the rescue. Note this assessment should not be used in urban setting. In the afternoon we covered athletic injury and fractures. In the wilderness setting, we often couldn’t verify the fracture since we don’t have CT scans. The injuries were identified as either usable or unusable. A usable limb is certainly more favored than the other, since the patient was more likely to walk on his or her own rather than being carried out on a litter.

Day 4:

Originally we had a night session on day three, but instructors decided to move it to day four. The day started with traction devices, both standard and improvised. Traction devices are often used on femur fractures. I think building an improvised traction device in the field must be quite difficult even under ideal situation; most people probably just splint it and evacuated the patient. Dislocation reduction was also taught at this time, most of us have seen it on sports channels when athletes reduced their own dislocations by pulling their fingers. This is another skill that should not be carried out in urban setting without written directive.


In the afternoon we learned about wound management and cleaning. This topic was complete new to me. No other EMS classes I took have similar trainings. In urban EMS setting, infection was not a major consideration since patients should have arrived the hospital within an hour or so; but in Tactical EMS setting, infection was controlled by either oral or IV antibiotics. In this training we were demonstrated how to properly clean an open wound with disinfected water, then closed it with closure stripes (if no wider than 0.5 inch), followed by protective transparent bandage.


Evening topics were heat and cold injuries. The instructors asked for volunteers for the scenarios. I volunteered myself, but was asked to wait for the next day. We had five students jumping into the Bay, and the rest of us have to keep them from hypothermia. We were instructed on making “thermal warp”, it’s basically several layers of sleeping bag, ground mat, tarp or ponchos warp over a hypothermia victim. The key was to remove all wet clothing and water from the victim before putting them into the warp. According to our “victim”, it was really warm inside the warp after a while. Adding heat packs or warm water bottles could also improve the process. For search and rescue purpose, there are also prefabricated hyperthermia kits from North American Rescue and Tac Meds Solutions.They use the same concept as a field made “thermal warp”, but more compact when stored. In the lecture following the scenarios, we studied other injuries such as trench foot and frostbite.


(An improvised "thermal warp")



Day 5:

Most of the day five was lectures. We went through altitude illness, sting, bites, lighting and submersions. It is interesting to me that altitude sickness could happen as low as 6000 feet (2000m), like Half Dome in Yosemite. Cold water submersion was also new to me. According to the training, far more people drown than died from hypothermia. Usually severe hypothermia does not set in until more than an hour later even if victim is not wearing protective closing. Most people die from panicking and drowning, hence stay calm is the key to survival.

In the late afternoon we made first “big” simulation with the introduction to ICS (Incident Command System). The simulation was based on a shipwreck accident, and I was playing a victim with femur fracture. (Another student Mike did a great job as a victim with a dislodged eye.) ICS is an important concept to manage a large scale mass casualty incident. The incident command has to allocate resources to proper location. My fellow students did a great job despite without formal ICS trainings. (There are separate classes from FEMA for ICS). There was no class for the following day, and we were given some badly needed rest.


(to be continued)
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  #134  
Old 05-02-2014, 11:13 PM
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Default Wilderness First Responder with Ready SF/NOLS, March 21st-30th, 2014. (2/2)

Day 7:


After having a full day of rest (day 6), we moved from trauma into medical emergency (i.e. illness and disease). During most of the day we practiced and discussed CPR in both urban and wilderness setting. It was more of a review on CPR practice since nearly everyone has a CPR card of some level, and I have ACLS (Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support) card. (As a side note, for those of you working with children, you should consider taking PALS or EPC courses for further pediatric emergency training.)

In wilderness setting, CPR is far less effective due to longer distance to ALS resources, less likely to have defibrillators at hand, and lower survival rate from cardiac arrest result from trauma. As a general guideline, rescuers should consider terminate CPR and pronounce that patients were deceased, if ROSC (Return of Spontaneous Circulation) was not achieved after 30 minutes of CPR, or if patient was found in cardiac arrest for more than 15 minutes without CPR. The exceptions were cardiac arrests from cold water submerge, hypothermia, drug overdose, or lighting strikes. Patients have higher chance for ROSC under these conditions.



In the afternoon we discussed respiratory emergency and altered mental status. Altered mental status could result from many causes, and sometime we wouldn’t be able to identify them in the field. The guidelines suggest to evacuate anyone with persist alter mental status. One of the most common respiratory emergencies is asthma, especially if leading an organized group. The standard treatment is to use patient’s MDI (metered dose inhaler), but consider evacuation if MDI failed to control the condition.


Day 8:

It was another day with night training. During the day we learned about acute abdomen conditions, allergies and diabetes. The most life threating abdomen condition is probably appendicitis. If left untreated, it could burst and cause large infection and septic shock, which could result in death. Allergies were also common in both wilderness and urban setting. Most allergies were minor, non-life threating ones, which can be controlled by changing environment or taking antihistamine medication. People with severe allergic reaction might have an epinephrine auto injector (Epipen) to relieve anaphylaxis. Beware that patients still need to take their antihistamine after the epinephrine shot.


(Epipen in action)



Diabetes, on the other hand, was more complicated. A patient could be in either hypoglycemia (low blood sugar, usually result from insulin overdose), or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar, usually from missed insulin shot).We were instructed that we should never administrated insulin on patients, only the patients know their doses. Instead, if we encountered patients with altered mental status with history of diabetes, we should always attempt to treat the case as hypoglycemia by giving them sugar. If patient was not conscious, they should be placed in recovery position (to protect their airways) and rubbed sugar on their gums. We also watched live demonstration of Epipen, which was really fascinating to me.

Later in the afternoon, we had a lecture on basic Search and Rescue (S&R) operations. There are dedicated S&R courses offered by National Association for Search and Rescue (NASAR) for those who are interesting in the related skill and knowledge.

That night we ran another “large” rescue operation in Marin Headlands. Each team was assigned two patients, one trauma and one medical (seizure). We were supposedly to treat trauma patient first when another teammate has a seizure. All of us did well in the scenario. It could only be better if it rains to increase difficulty.



Day 9:

It was the last day of “actual” class as the following day was mostly for skill and written exam. We went through a number of different topics, including mental health and urinary and reproductive parts. Other topics include medical legal, poisoning, and disease. We also discussed the proper setup for a wilderness first aid kit. I was planning to make a new kit for my car at this point. In the afternoon we practiced three test type scenarios, so each student practiced at least one as main rescuer, as assist rescuer, and as the patient. I was in the last group for patient and the rain became very hard on us. I was literally sitting in a puddle of water. That evening after class I went to Celtic Woman concert in Oakland with still half wet pants. I was tired but still enjoyed the show. All of us were ready for the final exam at this point.

Day 10:

It was the very last day. We began at 0800 as usual; the 100 questions written exam began at 0900 hour. Two groups of two students each would take skill tests outside. My group was the third from the last, partnered with Tine. The written test was quite simple, but a few “tricky” questions got me, and one of them were stupid mistake I made by not reading the question well.

The skill test was not difficult either; we suspected the patient had a simple fracture on the left shoulder from falling off a horse. Patient was allergic to bee sting, but we gave him antihistamine soon after the stung. Eventually all of us passed the exam, and were rewarded as Wilderness First Responder. A few of us decided to go deeper by go through WEMT certification in the future. I might go through EMT school again one day, but currently I will focus on Search and Rescue trainings first, then may serve as a volunteer to local SAR teams.

Who should attend this course:

Outdoor goers, climbers, hikers, hunters, trip leaders, camp counselor, park rangers, forest service, school teachers, etc. Basically anyone work in remote setting with nearest hospital being more than an hour away.
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  #135  
Old 07-17-2014, 11:22 AM
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We didn't have much in our 1st Aid Kit. I took the advice of our team mom who is a RN, she said go to Walmart, buy a huge plastic tub, and then go to the pharmacy section and fill it up....we did.
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  #136  
Old 08-02-2014, 7:20 AM
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I have a Recon Mountaineer and a NARP CLS bag stuffed with med gear. I also did CLS when I was in so that kinda helps too.
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Old 09-07-2014, 10:06 PM
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Just to point out, beware of those snake "extraction" kits on the market.


kits like this has been around since Vietnam era or even earlier. But recent studies have proved that they are ineffective against snake venom. UC studies showed the device only removed about 2% of venom.
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...08165196508345

In fact, major medical authorities nowadays such as American College of Surgeons, Wilderness Medical Society, or National Outdoor Leadership School have recommend against it.
Instead, patient should remain calm, splint the bitten limb to reduce movement, and transport to the nearest hospital ASAP. Avoid patient walking if possible, but if carrying patient out isn't practical then walking out should be considered.

You might find people on internet swear by it (such as on REI or Amazon's product review). But noted that majority of them do not have training in emergency medicine. Also up to 75% of snake bites are not venomized (dry bite), which might be the reason that some people believing the device is effective.

Last edited by Lugiahua; 09-09-2014 at 9:37 AM..
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  #138  
Old 09-08-2014, 8:46 PM
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I have a EMT trama kit. Actually it's about 5 years old now and I need to replace it.
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  #139  
Old 10-01-2014, 11:04 AM
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Yunnan Bai Yao is the single most important item in all of my bags, kits, glove compartments, medicine cabinet, etc. These days, the leaflet only says to take "x" amount as a supplement, daily, but before the FDA got involved, the first two indications were: gunshot wounds and severed limbs. I've used it for over 30 years as the first resort in stopping any type of bleeding, and it works better than anything and with a long track record of battle use. I carried it and used it in the Corps, as did many of my Marines. It goes pretty much everywhere with me now, and I recommend that everyone pick some up.
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Old 10-30-2014, 7:44 PM
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The problem of Yunnan Bai Yao was that like many Chinese medicine, there are many formulas by different companies. It is hard for non-Mandarin speaking person to distinguish the "real" ones.
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Old 12-11-2014, 12:11 PM
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National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) now offers online EMR bridge courses for Wilderness First Responder (WFR) to National Registration of Emergency Medical Responder (NREMR).

You have to enroll this course within one year from the most recent WFR or WFR Recertification course.
But I suspect that WFR from other programs might be eligible as well.

http://www.nols.edu/wmi/courses/emr.shtml
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  #142  
Old 12-19-2014, 5:13 PM
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Full BLS Trauma bag. Even have Epi Pens.
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  #143  
Old 01-04-2015, 8:59 PM
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  #144  
Old 01-06-2015, 8:34 AM
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Originally Posted by delta9 View Post
What is "hospital grade Tylenol" and what would you use it for?
Hospital grade costs about $600, but includes a little white paper cup, and sometimes a view of a cute nurse for about 45 seconds.

It is used to pay for the uninsured patients.
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  #145  
Old 01-06-2015, 10:10 AM
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Hospital grade tylenol is just extra strength tylenol usually 500mg. Lol hospital grade... sMH
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Old 01-07-2015, 6:43 PM
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Or maybe he means Tylenol with codien that stuff is good.
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Old 01-12-2015, 1:02 AM
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Ok, I got a question here.
Recently I got a Facebook ad by an user named "Prepping_2_Survive"

And he is selling some kind hemostatic agent in a tube on Ebay, like the ones in the link, but his other products look legit.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/121511886599

Quote:
2 - Blood Clotting Powders in Durable Moisture-Free Tubes (5 grams each tube, Exp: 08-2016)
Does anyone knows about what brand or ingredient of this powder? It sounds quite risky to me that using an unknown chemical powder on a major trauma.
I would stick with proven brands like QuikClot or Celox.
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  #148  
Old 02-11-2015, 12:46 PM
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Anyone know where I can get hypotonic saline, lactate ringers, or hexstend?
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  #149  
Old 02-11-2015, 1:17 PM
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Originally Posted by LiferLance View Post
Anyone know where I can get hypotonic saline, lactate ringers, or hexstend?
Pet meds again - I have used medvet - http://www.shopmedvet.com/category/iv-fluids ; their prices seem good and their service is fine.
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Old 02-18-2015, 2:49 PM
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Reading the Doom and Bloom web site again, and here's a video about their Gunshot kit - http://www.doomandbloom.net/nurse-am...treatment-kit/

A new-ish item is in it - the Celox-A Applicator.

About $26 at Amazon; I just bought 4.
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Old 02-18-2015, 5:22 PM
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First aid kit?

No.

First aid kits!

I have several. Yes, a few general purpose kits with a smattering of everything but I also have purpose built kits that fill .50 cal ammo cans with contents focused around trauma (gunshot, bleeding, broken bones), another for burns, and others with OTC and vet antibiotics.

I have a couple of kits that are small enough to tuck inside the corner of the camper or SUV that contain the normal range of camping related first aid needs - burns, cuts, skin rashes/bug bites, diarrhea and pain meds.

In the SUV glove compartment I carry a tourniquet and a CPR valve figuring I'll need those ASAP and seconds count.
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Old 03-03-2015, 1:28 PM
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The new CORE kit from NAR looks really decent for it's price/content.

$50 comes with Combat Gauze LE, CAT, and a Trauma Dressing, which usually cost $80 if purchased separately.
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  #153  
Old 03-16-2015, 6:24 AM
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Silver coins for barter meds...
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  #154  
Old 03-18-2015, 8:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunGreg2107 View Post
drugs
epi auto
epi multidose
atropine
naloxone
activated charcoal suspension
adenosine
amiodarone
aspirin 325 and 81mg
calcium chlor
dextrose
diphenhydramine
glucagon
lidocaine
mag sulfate
nitro spray and tablets
Zofran iv and tabs
sodium bi carb
vasopressin
verapamil
motrin
Tylenol
oral glucose
Your missing morphine or fentanyl. I'm very curious how you got all those drugs. Maybe I missed it, but a cardiac monitor would absolutely be needed with those cardiac drugs. Nice kit btw.
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Old 06-05-2015, 11:54 AM
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With respect, I think that cardiac med list above is somewhat unrealistic...

- Under the normal situation, lay rescuer cannot legally use those Rx medication.
- Under SHTF, they will die nonetheless.
What are you going to do even if you achieved a ROSC? Without a hospital, you can't correct the underlying causes behind their cardiac arrest...


Anyway, this is my new outdoor trauma kit remade from some older kits


I use a thigh bag because belt bag often interfere with my backpack too much
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Old 06-11-2015, 4:36 PM
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Click to order



Order here Click to order

I have learned really recently that you just never know when you will need this stuff...
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Old 08-12-2015, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Librarian View Post
Pet meds again - I have used medvet - http://www.shopmedvet.com/category/iv-fluids ; their prices seem good and their service is fine.
Wow - thanks - the last time I looked into this the online vet supply places wanted scrips.

I want to build up a big home/core kit again. Believe it or not mine disappeared. All the usual suspects plus stethoscope, BP cuff, lactate ringers, field surgery stuff...

EMT-B (decades ago) Wilderness (not quite as many decades ago), some specialty classes, and more recently CERT & Red Cross stuff...

I would never consider using some of the more extreme stuff (lactate ringers, field surgery, pet/vet antibiotics)... Unless we have a world-changing black swan event, in which case all bets are off.
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Old 08-12-2015, 1:33 PM
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I have not seen Gaffers tape mentioned.

It looks like duct tape, but it is not as sticky. It is made for gaffers to tape down wires so they are not a trip hazard, but the stuff pulls up off of hard and soft surfaces without damaging them. It is a great alternative to duct tape for emergency medical applications.

I find it much easier to use and much more effective than moleskin to prevent or treat blisters.

I sent a roll of gaffers tape with my wife when she went to take her first Front Sight course with some friends of hers. She became everyone's hero, as they used the tape on fingers and feet.

I use it almost anywhere I might use medical tape - it is tougher, stronger, less expensive and versatile.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/s/ref=is...refix=Gaffers+
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Old 08-14-2015, 9:13 AM
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Home/travel First Aid Kit - 4x4 bandages, 2x2 bandages, bandaids, a few Kerlix rolls, 10x30 trauma dressing, compression bandages, tape, ibuprofen, water, gloves, and possibly some other stuff which I will not disclose.

IFAK - CAT tourniquet, Israeli bandage, Quickclot, Halo Chest seals (2), Nasopharyngeal airway with lube, gloves, compression bandage, Kerlix Roll, Ibuprofen, tape, trauma shears, sharpie.
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Old 08-14-2015, 9:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunGreg2107 View Post
I carry in my suv a pretty comprehensive med kit. keep in mind that I am an nremt-paramedic. heres the contents as best as I can remember

bsi/ppe
about 20 sets of nitrile gloves
faceshield
goggles
2 gowns
5 n95 respirators

airway
complete opa set
npa set about 7 sizes with surgilube
endo tube set
laryngo set with blades and spare bulb
a few king airways
some lm airways
3 bulb suction syringe

breathing
1 ped non rebreather mask
1 ped nasal cannula
2 adult cannula
2 adult nrb mask
jumbo d size 02 tank
regulator and spare tank key
adult and ped bvm

bleeding
6 5x9 trauma pads
4 cat
h and h bandages
a few ibd
lots of 4x4 and 2x2 gauze

tools
adult and ped bp cuff
stethoscope
pen lights and small streamlight
tweezers
2 scapels # 10 I believe
curved and straight Kelly hemo
magill forcep
glucometer and lancets and strips

drugs
epi auto
epi multidose
atropine
naloxone
activated charcoal suspension
adenosine
amiodarone
aspirin 325 and 81mg
calcium chlor
dextrose
diphenhydramine
glucagon
lidocaine
mag sulfate
nitro spray and tablets
Zofran iv and tabs
sodium bi carb
vasopressin
verapamil
motrin
Tylenol
oral glucose

iv bag
alcohol preps
iv tube sets
lock ext sets
2 1000ml bags 1 ns 1 lr
misc cath about 10
tourniquets
some 4x4 in here as well

I also keep a pre made ob kit

have some other misc stuff like sutures trauma shears tape

I now feel like I should go take apart my bag and when I do I will add pictures
Do you carry a monitor with all of those cardiac drugs, otherwise theyre worthless.

Last edited by medicdude; 08-14-2015 at 4:29 PM..
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