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  #1  
Old 04-01-2012, 7:46 PM
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Question Why would one cut their recoil spring?

I received my parts kit for my P220 and noticed that my existing green recoil spring had been previously cut. What would be the reason to cut it? My new spring is about 3/4" longer and very stiff. Any benefit or drawback of doing this? I have not fired it since I installed all the new parts so I will update with my range report. Thanks in advance.
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Old 04-01-2012, 7:49 PM
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You might be about to find out

Cutting it reduces the pressure of the spring. I have heard of reloaders doing this if they are using light loads.
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Old 04-01-2012, 7:51 PM
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I would assume the longer spring would have more tension and be more acceptable to higher velocity rounds.
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Old 04-01-2012, 8:48 PM
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You might cut the spring of a gun that is short stroking.

Light loads are one potential cause of short stroking but not the only one.
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Old 04-02-2012, 9:33 AM
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Because they think it's what should be done to reduce the spring rate. Which is doesn't do.

Spring rate should only be reduced by using a spring either with more active coils or thiner wire diameter.
The former being a fine adjustment and the later being a more course adjustment
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Old 04-02-2012, 6:29 PM
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Amen to Mr. Stottlemyer!

A spring is a torsion bar that has been coiled up - reduce the length of a torsion bar and it gets stronger, not weaker. Reducing the length of a coil spring (if it's under compression when installed, as most springs are) reduces the pre-load of the spring, but actually increases the spring rate. Do that to a fire-control spring and you've just made it very non-linear, generally doing the opposite of what's intended.
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Old 04-02-2012, 6:29 PM
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Amen to Mr. Stottlemyer!

A spring is a torsion bar that has been coiled up - reduce the length of a torsion bar and it gets stronger, not weaker. Reducing the length of a coil spring (if it's under compression when installed, as most springs are) reduces the pre-load of the spring, but actually increases the spring rate. Do that to a fire-control spring and you've just made it very non-linear, generally doing the opposite of what's intended.
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Old 04-02-2012, 6:57 PM
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Yeah I left out the part that it does in fact increase the spring rate. I wasn't sure if that was just going to go over most heads.
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Old 04-02-2012, 7:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcstott View Post
Yeah I left out the part that it does in fact increase the spring rate. I wasn't sure if that was just going to go over most heads.
It would. You should see how many people believe that storing springs compressed weakens them over time.
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Old 04-02-2012, 7:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turo View Post
It would. You should see how many people believe that storing springs compressed weakens them over time.
Yep the spring don't care if it's compressed or not. It's the cycling of the spring that wears it out.

Think of that 49 ford sitting in the yard it's springs have been compressed since day one. The shocks are shot not the springs

Last edited by kcstott; 04-02-2012 at 7:28 PM..
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Old 04-03-2012, 8:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kcstott View Post
Yep the spring don't care if it's compressed or not. It's the cycling of the spring that wears it out.

Think of that 49 ford sitting in the yard it's springs have been compressed since day one. The shocks are shot not the springs
Exactly, Its the compression and decompression of the spring that wheres it out, further more it is not a common practice in the gunsmithing trade to just cut springs, this can be dangerous and lead to unsafe triggers, runaways and a slew of cycling, ejecting and extraction problems. If you are trying to achieve more performance in your firearm, there is usually a more "professional" way than just cutting a spring. I think you were smart to change the components out. Keep us posted.
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Old 04-03-2012, 8:14 AM
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Simple.

Because when the spring is fully compressed it is still too long -

Causing the slide to prematurely "stop" before completely cycling....
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Old 04-03-2012, 9:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DannyInSoCal View Post
Simple.

Because when the spring is fully compressed it is still too long -

Causing the slide to prematurely "stop" before completely cycling....
Then that's the wrong spring all together.
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Old 04-03-2012, 8:11 PM
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All great responses. Thanks fellas.
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Old 04-04-2012, 9:15 PM
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count the coils in both springs. More than likely your old spring has just compressed some from being under constant tension. I see this on pistols more than 5 years old, or have more than 5,000 rounds through them.
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Old 04-05-2012, 7:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarge1572 View Post
count the coils in both springs. More than likely your old spring has just compressed some from being under constant tension. I see this on pistols more than 5 years old, or have more than 5,000 rounds through them.
^^^ This. Sometimes spring length is used as a "replace when" indicator.
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Old 04-05-2012, 7:37 AM
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No it is in fact cut. I can tell by the jagged cut mark on the coil and how shinny the bare metal looks.
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