Calguns.net  

Home My iTrader Join the NRA Donate to CGSSA Sponsors CGN Google Search
CA Semiauto Ban(AW)ID Flowchart CA Handgun Ban ID Flowchart CA Shotgun Ban ID Flowchart
Go Back   Calguns.net > FIREARMS DISCUSSIONS > California handguns
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read

California handguns Discuss your favorite California handgun technical and related questions here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-21-2019, 5:11 PM
Paul053 Paul053 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Sierra Madre, CA
Posts: 1,022
iTrader: 64 / 100%
Default Anyone with Colt Python knowledge?

Got an opportunity to buy a colt python from a coworker whose trying to recoup some money. Serial number starts with A***** (5 digits). He wants 2200 for it. Is it worth it?

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-21-2019, 5:27 PM
dfletcher's Avatar
dfletcher dfletcher is offline
I need a LIFE!!
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 13,042
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Default

Assuming the serial number is between AL0101 to AL9999 it was made in 1980. Difficult to tell from the photographs but there appears to be no significant wear, however two issues -

Bluing on the frame behind the recoil shield appears to be a bit cloudy. That could be just from the reflection or it could be the finish. I had a Python with that problem. It can't be reworked or polished out.

The original factory wood grips are missing - the period correct ones have the straight line top checkering pattern and cost about $400.00. A fellow on eBay makes near exact copies for about $225.00. The issues with that are a) they are brand new and look out of place on a gun with any wear and b) they look a heck of a lot better than factory original.

I would also want to check under those rubber grips and ensure the gun functions as one would expect from a Python. Rubber grips can trap moisture and cause surface damage, which may or may not be covered up by the factory grips.

$2,200.00 plus the cost of grips would be a "no go" for me.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-21-2019, 5:41 PM
Python6357 Python6357 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 470
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Default

Yeah, without the original grips, I'd be more around $1800.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-21-2019, 5:56 PM
TKM's Avatar
TKM TKM is offline
This gun is liberty;
CGN Contributor - Lifetime
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: hold for certain that the day you no more have it, you will be returned to slavery.
Posts: 8,465
iTrader: 68 / 100%
Default

The finish on a well cared for Python is a thing of beauty. That is a nice Python but not a well cared for Python. Muzzle looks a little rough around the edges.
__________________
Illegal aliens sent $56 billion in cash to their home countries last year alone. That's after their kids enjoyed free education, free lunches and free medical care paid for by you.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-21-2019, 6:42 PM
colossians323's Avatar
colossians323 colossians323 is offline
I need a LIFE!!
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 19,381
iTrader: 41 / 100%
Default

LOL, in California.............yes.
Buy it if the finish is not worn
__________________
LIVE FREE OR DIE!

M. Sage's I have a dream speech;

Quote:
Originally Posted by M. Sage View Post
I dream about the day that the average would-be rapist is afraid to approach a woman who's walking alone at night. I dream of the day when two punks talk each other out of sticking up a liquor store because it's too damn risky.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-21-2019, 7:02 PM
Litespeeds's Avatar
Litespeeds Litespeeds is online now
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NorCal, SF Bay Area
Posts: 2,983
iTrader: 172 / 100%
Default

That Python is more of a shooters grade in my book. Maybe around 90% condition. I would say $1,600 to $1,800 is about the right price since it doesn't have the wood grips or original box and documents.
__________________
For Sale:
Custom Glockmeister G19 gen 3
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-21-2019, 7:38 PM
walterSOBCHAK's Avatar
walterSOBCHAK walterSOBCHAK is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 225
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

You could score 2 or 3 really sweet Smiths for that price.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-22-2019, 7:40 PM
IVth Horseman IVth Horseman is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Northern Ca
Posts: 1,402
iTrader: 19 / 100%
Default

I wouldn’t pay that much. The python market has cooled a bit and better deals can be found.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-22-2019, 8:26 PM
Dvrjon Dvrjon is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 6,919
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

1. If you want a Python, buy the Python. Its value to you is not its value to us. For example, I have a 1972 Python 6” barrel in Nickel. My Dad bought it for me on my 21st BDay ($179), and I don’t want or need another.

Everything below presumes you’ve unloaded the gun....

2. Look into the cylinder chambers from the front. A ring of carbon set back about 2/3rds of the way from the cylinder end indicates more .38 than .357 (a good thing) and crappy maintenance (a bad thing.)

3. Check lock up on the cylinder. When the pistol is cocked, does the cylinder rotate? Look down the bore and rock the cylinder. If it moves enough to mis-align the cylinder from the bore, the price drops, and your repairs increase. You’ll understand why when the bullet forcing cone misaligns and shaves lead out of the cylinder gap.

4. Check end shake. With hammer down, pull and push the cylinder forward and back. There should be some movement, but not a bunch.

5. Check the alignment of the cylinder to the frame. Rotate the cylinder pulling back on it and watch the space between the cylinder face and the forcing cone. It should remain about 0.010” and not deviate. If it does, something’s wrong with the frame or the forcing cone. (I had a gunsmith FUBAR a Colt Lawman Mk III in such a way that the cylinder wasn’t true to the forcing cone. When the cylinder rotated, it bound up on one side as the cylinder face moved up against the forcing cone. Another gunsmith fixed it without a bunch of drama...and the first one paid.)

6. Swing the cylinder out, and spin it. Look for binding or wobble, any indication that the ejector rod is bent/warped.

7. Look at the underside of the top strap where it meets the frame above the forcing cone. If there is any erosion or metal pitting, it’s caused by heavy loads and gas escaping and cutting the frame. Find another Python.

8. On this gun, I’d want to know more about the ding on the end to the barrel...it doesn’t hit the bore, but it’s an interesting mark. There also are some contact points on the frame (left side in front it the trigger guard which would annoy me.)

Enjoy your decision. All you can do is evaluate everything you can and come to a decision that the price is right for you.
__________________
"People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.”
"Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently-talented fool."
"The things that come to those who wait may well be the things left by those who got there first."
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-22-2019, 9:36 PM
Paul053 Paul053 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Sierra Madre, CA
Posts: 1,022
iTrader: 64 / 100%
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dvrjon View Post
1. If you want a Python, buy the Python. Its value to you is not its value to us. For example, I have a 1972 Python 6” barrel in Nickel. My Dad bought it for me on my 21st BDay ($179), and I don’t want or need another.



Everything below presumes you’ve unloaded the gun....



2. Look into the cylinder chambers from the front. A ring of carbon set back about 2/3rds of the way from the cylinder end indicates more .38 than .357 (a good thing) and crappy maintenance (a bad thing.)



3. Check lock up on the cylinder. When the pistol is cocked, does the cylinder rotate? Look down the bore and rock the cylinder. If it moves enough to mis-align the cylinder from the bore, the price drops, and your repairs increase. You’ll understand why when the bullet forcing cone misaligns and shaves lead out of the cylinder gap.



4. Check end shake. With hammer down, pull and push the cylinder forward and back. There should be some movement, but not a bunch.



5. Check the alignment of the cylinder to the frame. Rotate the cylinder pulling back on it and watch the space between the cylinder face and the forcing cone. It should remain about 0.010” and not deviate. If it does, something’s wrong with the frame or the forcing cone. (I had a gunsmith FUBAR a Colt Lawman Mk III in such a way that the cylinder wasn’t true to the forcing cone. When the cylinder rotated, it bound up on one side as the cylinder face moved up against the forcing cone. Another gunsmith fixed it without a bunch of drama...and the first one paid.)



6. Swing the cylinder out, and spin it. Look for binding or wobble, any indication that the ejector rod is bent/warped.



7. Look at the underside of the top strap where it meets the frame above the forcing cone. If there is any erosion or metal pitting, it’s caused by heavy loads and gas escaping and cutting the frame. Find another Python.



8. On this gun, I’d want to know more about the ding on the end to the barrel...it doesn’t hit the bore, but it’s an interesting mark. There also are some contact points on the frame (left side in front it the trigger guard which would annoy me.)



Enjoy your decision. All you can do is evaluate everything you can and come to a decision that the price is right for you.
Thanks for the detailed message. I will take all this into consideration.

Sent from my SM-T710 using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-22-2019, 10:03 PM
hambam105 hambam105 is offline
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 4,713
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default

Colt and S&W QC already had a straight south bound trajectory by late 1975.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-23-2019, 6:45 AM
Dvrjon Dvrjon is offline
Calguns Addict
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 6,919
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Default


Marketplace Python
.
__________________
"People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.”
"Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently-talented fool."
"The things that come to those who wait may well be the things left by those who got there first."
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 6:32 AM.




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Proudly hosted by GeoVario the Premier 2A host.
Calguns.net, the 'Calguns' name and all associated variants and logos are ® Trademark and © Copyright 2002-2018, Calguns.net an Incorporated Company All Rights Reserved.
Calguns.net and The Calguns Foundation have no affiliation and are in no way related to each other.
All opinions, statements and remarks made by Calguns.net on this web site and elsewhere are solely attributable to Calguns.net.