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  #41  
Old 06-14-2019, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by RiskyBusiness View Post
Do you mean Mwr? I mean everything is cut but I think I chose the wrong material for my base
I mean, if you have all the joints ground and cleaned and ready to be welded I can do it for you.
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  #42  
Old 06-14-2019, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by ar15barrels View Post
Hold my beer and watch this.
This is definitely something that needs to be seen in person and cannot be replicated by a yt video. I had a welder tell me the difficulty for welding this project was a 2/10... I figured hell I got into reloading then casting, might as well give welding a shot.

Working with a 110v $80 welder from Amazon. 3/32 sticks 6013. It feels like I wont be able to use the 2x2 square tubes as a base because they're too heavy and thick.

My home outlet is rated for only 15amps.
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  #43  
Old 06-14-2019, 12:32 PM
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OK, in that case I would return the equipment.

Not trying to discourage, but it is worth picking up a miller or lincoln electric. Even the tombstone. The tombstone is not expensive at all on craigslist.
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  #44  
Old 06-14-2019, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by ar15barrels View Post
If you want to come to my shop, I can give you a 5 minute lesson and show you how real welders are supposed to run.
BTW risky business, it is worth taking your mask, box of rod, 8" piece of angle iron, and 6 pack of beer over and take this guy up on this offer. 5 minutes of instruction beats 3 hours of youtube. especially now that you've tried welding and know what questions to ask.

then go buy the tombstone. Or a fancy one if you want, but the tombstone is good enough for 2/10 welding
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  #45  
Old 06-14-2019, 1:56 PM
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Originally Posted by RiskyBusiness View Post
I'm watching youtube videos and a job like this seems pretty easy you really cant **** it up stick welding.


Reminds me of this hairy little fella who had seen soldiers shooting rifles.

https://youtu.be/QxYmm5yCJBg
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  #46  
Old 06-14-2019, 1:59 PM
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No need to facepalm. we've all been in the same place for some skill or another. Most important IMO is to keep at it, because welding, even farm quality welding, is a great skill to have for general purpose building.

You can always grind off the ugly welds, and noone will ever know
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  #47  
Old 06-14-2019, 2:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiskyBusiness View Post
This is definitely something that needs to be seen in person and cannot be replicated by a yt video. I had a welder tell me the difficulty for welding this project was a 2/10... I figured hell I got into reloading then casting, might as well give welding a shot.

Working with a 110v $80 welder from Amazon. 3/32 sticks 6013. It feels like I wont be able to use the 2x2 square tubes as a base because they're too heavy and thick.

My home outlet is rated for only 15amps.
Besides the lack of experience, the welds simply look like you donít have enough power.
Thatís simply equipment.
I bet I could get you welding in 5 minutes on a good welder and you would see how much easier it is when you are not fighting the equipment.
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  #48  
Old 06-14-2019, 2:16 PM
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I didn't read the entire thing, did you get a stick welder? I honestly would stay away from the cheap HFT flux core welder as it is AC and you're better off using DC for flux core. I got the HFT and returned it within a day. Went to home depot and got the Lincoln Flux Core for like $170 I believe. It's a DC unit and works wonders for my needs. I'm not a welder, I learned through watching Youtube videos and just going for it, doing small projects. I love it though. I've done target stands with rebar, rocket stoves using 4x4" square tubing, I made a wall-to-wall storage rack for my garage using angle iron scrap. Just visit a local metal yard for supplies as it is MUCH cheaper than buying it all at lowes or home depot. Don't give up though, my welds looked kinda like yours at first. Also, it looks like you just went for it without prepping first the metal, which is a must if you want pretty welds. You have to remove the millscale and oils. Otherwise it'll look like crap.
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  #49  
Old 06-14-2019, 2:19 PM
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another note, stay away from the no name junk on Amazon. If you want affordable, I'd start with a Lincoln Flux Core unit. Once you're ready for thicker material for say, a truck rack or something structural, then go up to a MIG setup with a tank. The HFT one is actually a good one for beginners and the price point. MIG welds are also cleaner looking and can handle thicker materials.
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  #50  
Old 06-14-2019, 2:22 PM
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you can rent a 110 welder at home depot.
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  #51  
Old 06-14-2019, 2:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
No need to facepalm. we've all been in the same place for some skill or another. Most important IMO is to keep at it, because welding, even farm quality welding, is a great skill to have for general purpose building.

You can always grind off the ugly welds, and noone will ever know
The was for the mess he made of his parts. As to the bolded in your quote. And now he will get at least on hours worth of practice making sparks with a sidewheel. Removing bird**** from his build kit, so he can have someone show him how it's not as easy as he thought. But a lot easier than he made it.

It takes a crap ton of practice to strike an arc and keep that puddle going where it needs to be.

Yes, we all screw up. And Yes, we also all expect our friends to LTFA off when we do. It's part of the learning experience.
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  #52  
Old 06-14-2019, 3:17 PM
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Originally Posted by RiskyBusiness View Post
Any welders in so cal that specialize in small jobs? Would love to do it myself but these machines are like $300.
I just cant - with you guys who suggest $100 welders. $100 welders just melt the wire. You're not transferring heat or properly laying a good weld. A hobbyist welder at a minimum is $900-$1,200. Think Millermatic (3 settings and your off) when you scaff at my $900 to $1,200 comment.

UNLESS!!! you have talent - then a $100 welder 'can' be used as a last resort, in the middle of Baja to fix a bumper, tie rod, light mount, etc. But it wont weld thick metal. Even then, when you make it home, you're going to tear it apart and weld it right.
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  #53  
Old 06-14-2019, 3:22 PM
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Originally Posted by RiskyBusiness View Post
Any welders in so cal that specialize in small jobs? Would love to do it myself but these machines are like $300.
What are you looking for? I've fabricated a few custom shooting target stands. PM your number and I'll send you some pics.
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  #54  
Old 06-14-2019, 4:25 PM
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Originally Posted by downdiver2 View Post
I just cant - with you guys who suggest $100 welders. $100 welders just melt the wire. You're not transferring heat or properly laying a good weld. A hobbyist welder at a minimum is $900-$1,200. Think Millermatic (3 settings and your off) when you scaff at my $900 to $1,200 comment.

UNLESS!!! you have talent - then a $100 welder 'can' be used as a last resort, in the middle of Baja to fix a bumper, tie rod, light mount, etc. But it wont weld thick metal. Even then, when you make it home, you're going to tear it apart and weld it right.
Spent a lot of time trying to weld with a HF $100 POS, had learned stick welding in high school, but 25 years later was banging my head making beads and slag when I thought MIG would be easier... buddy convinced me to try his millermatic, while I can't say my welds looked like stacked dimes they were actual welds. Went and bought a 211 and LOVE it.

OP either buy a decent welder or take it to someone who does and be done with it.
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  #55  
Old 06-14-2019, 6:18 PM
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Offer's still up, I sent you a PM with my contact info.

Mark


QUOTE=RiskyBusiness;23107203]So.... I feel like returning this welding gear because im just not cut out for it lol my experience was just horrible. Power strip kept getting cut, had to reset it if the electrode got too hot. Had to keep the power under 50% otherwise power would shut off. Used up almost an entire box of electrode sticks and as you can see i have two shafts loose or came off. Also I messed up on the fittings, went to pattons and i dont think these square tubes will be any good as a base, also the 1ft square tube i was planning on using as a entry for the 5ft angle bar is too tight for the bar to enter.

Angle bar's are 1.5"x1.5" .25" thick
Square tubes 2x2" .25" thick

Planned to use two 3ft angles as base legs, two 2" square tubes to be welded over the legs to connect them.


Mwr you say you're in pomona? I'll take you up on that offer for help when ever you have spare time.
IMG][/IMG][/QUOTE]
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  #56  
Old 06-14-2019, 6:23 PM
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Default Welder

Offer still stands..
I sent you a PM with me contact information.

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QUOTE=RiskyBusiness;23107203]So.... I feel like returning this welding gear because im just not cut out for it lol my experience was just horrible. Power strip kept getting cut, had to reset it if the electrode got too hot. Had to keep the power under 50% otherwise power would shut off. Used up almost an entire box of electrode sticks and as you can see i have two shafts loose or came off. Also I messed up on the fittings, went to pattons and i dont think these square tubes will be any good as a base, also the 1ft square tube i was planning on using as a entry for the 5ft angle bar is too tight for the bar to enter.

Angle bar's are 1.5"x1.5" .25" thick
Square tubes 2x2" .25" thick

Planned to use two 3ft angles as base legs, two 2" square tubes to be welded over the legs to connect them.


Mwr you say you're in pomona? I'll take you up on that offer for help when ever you have spare time.
IMG][/IMG][/QUOTE]
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  #57  
Old 06-15-2019, 7:36 PM
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UPDATE: So i decided to try again but with the machine plugged straight into the outlet. Also a family friend gave me some smaller electrodes and the welding went a whole lot better especially running the power to 100% capacity. The breaker tripped a few times but only if the electrode stuck for more than 4 seconds, not that big a deal. Tree is almost finished and i'm going to go back to my initial statement "this seems pretty easy you really cant **** it up stick welding." haha

It was just like AR15barrels said, i was running it too low on power. Thanks to everyone that encouraged me to keep trying, i even had this welder boxed back up but decided to give it another try. And i appreciate to all those who offered to come by and they'll glue it for me or teach me and there were a lot of you! Pretty cool community of welders, gotta love calguns. Happy Fathers day fellas, enjoy your weekend
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  #58  
Old 06-15-2019, 7:39 PM
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You need more heat!


Hard to tell, but did you bring the surfaces to be welded first so they would be clean steel?
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  #59  
Old 06-16-2019, 6:35 AM
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You need more heat!


Hard to tell, but did you bring the surfaces to be welded first so they would be clean steel?
I did on my 2nd attempt. Cleaned surface with a flap disc. Got more heat by running the machine at 100%
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  #60  
Old 06-16-2019, 9:53 PM
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Hey, Risky.
Perhaps if I'd spoken up sooner, you'd have saved a lot of trouble. But then you'd not have the experience that you've recently gained.

Here's my thoughts: I wouldn't use a cheap welder. You get what you pay for. You can probably do the job with a cheap welder, but it won't be as easy. Part of the problem with your welds is you're not watching your puddle. That's where you want to be looking. Move the electrode side to side, looking for a good puddle. If you have the power/feed set accordingly, and you're watching the puddle, you'll be getting good penetration. But if you linger too long, you'll blow through your tubing. You didn't think it would be easy, did you? Anyway, keep your eye not he puddle and move forward, keeping your puddle moving, allowing the area behind you to freeze, and all without blowing through the material.

I bought an off-the-shelf tree because I didn't want to go through the trouble of making one. But you an do this. Set up the machine according to the instructions, then WATCH your puddle.
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  #61  
Old 06-17-2019, 8:14 AM
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Originally Posted by baranski View Post
Take a welding course at a community college and build it there with quality welding equipment.
I looked into this. Not many CCs doing this anymore, at least not near me. It's all trade schools now and I am not looking to certify. I am going off Youtube videos and what I learned 45 years ago with a stick welder.
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Old 06-17-2019, 8:22 PM
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Originally Posted by RustyIron View Post
Hey, Risky.
Perhaps if I'd spoken up sooner, you'd have saved a lot of trouble. But then you'd not have the experience that you've recently gained.

Here's my thoughts: I wouldn't use a cheap welder. You get what you pay for. You can probably do the job with a cheap welder, but it won't be as easy. Part of the problem with your welds is you're not watching your puddle. That's where you want to be looking. Move the electrode side to side, looking for a good puddle. If you have the power/feed set accordingly, and you're watching the puddle, you'll be getting good penetration. But if you linger too long, you'll blow through your tubing. You didn't think it would be easy, did you? Anyway, keep your eye not he puddle and move forward, keeping your puddle moving, allowing the area behind you to freeze, and all without blowing through the material.

I bought an off-the-shelf tree because I didn't want to go through the trouble of making one. But you an do this. Set up the machine according to the instructions, then WATCH your puddle.
Thanks man. A lot had to do with setting the machine up correctly and I struggled a lot because i wasn't getting enough power to feed and when i did i would trip my breaker in seconds if the wire stayed in the same spot for more than a second. I'm now running a heavy duty extension from the outlet in the laundry room where I can get enough power to run the welder at 100%. I was told stick welding was the most difficult weld to learn compared to the others that automatically feed the wire as you weld. It's been enjoyable when it works i'll say that much.
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  #63  
Old 06-17-2019, 8:24 PM
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I looked into this. Not many CCs doing this anymore, at least not near me. It's all trade schools now and I am not looking to certify. I am going off Youtube videos and what I learned 45 years ago with a stick welder.
Mt Sac offers this but their makerspace closed for the summer. Also they require you to spend 10hrs there before using their "level 3" equipment and you have to pass a safety quiz. Pretty cool gear they have. You can actually make your own ar500 plates with their plasma cutter.
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  #64  
Old 06-18-2019, 7:46 AM
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We want pictures of the finished product
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  #65  
Old 06-18-2019, 8:04 AM
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Lets see the finished product - I love home projects.

For all that are interested, do not forget that you can order on-line from McMaster Carr small pieces of sheets and shapes as well for small projects, albeit a little pricey.

PS - I sent you a text as well.

Mark
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  #66  
Old 06-18-2019, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by wchutt View Post
Spent a lot of time trying to weld with a HF $100 POS, had learned stick welding in high school, but 25 years later was banging my head making beads and slag when I thought MIG would be easier... buddy convinced me to try his millermatic, while I can't say my welds looked like stacked dimes they were actual welds. Went and bought a 211 and LOVE it.

OP either buy a decent welder or take it to someone who does and be done with it.
Exact one I have. I bought the $150 Blue Hawk Mig from lowes and spent some time jacking up a go kart build my son and I were working on. I sold it at a garage sale and bought the Millermatic 211 and haven't had a bad weld since. I can stack the dimes on occasion - but what I like is the quality of the welds and the ease of 1,2,3 settings and you're off and welding. Im running the 75/25 argon/co mix in mine.
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Old 06-18-2019, 11:34 AM
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I have the Miller Multimatic 215 and love it. Comes with the necessary items for stick and MIG, and you can also buy a TIG kit for it. Just about all you need for hobbyist welding of any type.

Recently got the TIG kit and been practicing. Kinda like rubbing your head, patting your tummy, and hopping on one foot at the same time. LOL.
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Old 06-18-2019, 12:07 PM
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First and only comment: Clean your material before you weld.

Like clean the sheet out of it, grind the sheet out of your material and get shiny bare metal, then weld.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mwr View Post
Offer's still up, I sent you a PM with my contact info.

Mark


QUOTE=RiskyBusiness;23107203]So.... I feel like returning this welding gear because im just not cut out for it lol my experience was just horrible. Power strip kept getting cut, had to reset it if the electrode got too hot. Had to keep the power under 50% otherwise power would shut off. Used up almost an entire box of electrode sticks and as you can see i have two shafts loose or came off. Also I messed up on the fittings, went to pattons and i dont think these square tubes will be any good as a base, also the 1ft square tube i was planning on using as a entry for the 5ft angle bar is too tight for the bar to enter.

Angle bar's are 1.5"x1.5" .25" thick
Square tubes 2x2" .25" thick

Planned to use two 3ft angles as base legs, two 2" square tubes to be welded over the legs to connect them.


Mwr you say you're in pomona? I'll take you up on that offer for help when ever you have spare time.
IMG][/IMG]
[/QUOTE]
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Old 06-18-2019, 5:09 PM
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Late to the party but I agree it looks like on your first attempt you didn't have enough heat and/or needed to clean metal well. 1/4" is on the edge of what a 110VAC welder can do well. It'll stick together and a good welder can make it work but you need to run it at max.

I have both the cheap 110VAC and 220VAC Harbor Freight flux core / MIG transformer welders. The 110VAC is fine for thinner stuff below 1/4". It's AC out of the box so more splatter. I modded it with a rectifier so it's DC now and a lot hotter.

The 220VAC unit is DC and can run a lot hotter than the 110VAC unit. It doesn't have capacitors but for farm/hobby stuff it'll be fine. For that thick of material you're doing, I'd suggest a 220VAC unit so you have some power margin and not tripping your breakers.

What you get with the more expensive units is features and slightly easier/better weld quality. Capacitors are expensive. MIG is a littler nicer to use than flux core / stick but either will work fine for occasional jobs. I don't think there's anything wrong with the cheap welders when one is learning, it's just a little bit harder than a nice MIG machine.

I need to do aluminum now so looking for an AC TIG machine. They're expensive...
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Old 06-18-2019, 6:26 PM
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Default Welding for a dueling tree

That is how you learn. I have been welding since High School including underwater welding. I have been out of it for 25 years. Just started welding again 2 weeks ago. It is like riding a bike.

If you need help you can PM me. I had a broken shovel that I fixed last week. Here is my first and second weld. This is on a Lincoln 140 MIG with Argon/CO2 mix... not bad for not welding in 25 years...

First weld...



Second weld...



I can even count how many hours I have spent practice welding scrap pieces together, and also welding coupons for testing....must be at least 3 to 4 thousand hours...

Practice, practice, practice, and a good welding machine helps...Metal prep is a must!!!

There are very few exceptions when you can get a good weld with dirty metal. Cleaner the weld area, usually the better the weld. You need to also remove the dull gray Mill Scale on the metal if it has any. That Mill Scale does not help you weld, or help the strength of the weld. I see to many people just weld to it, and it makes me cringe....

Just FYI, some of my first welds looked very similar to yours. It takes practice. Be patient and practice. You should cover all bare exposed skin, you can get a nasty UV burn from Arc welding, even just a few minutes of welding. On a hot summer day, I would rather be sweaty than UV burned. I also cover my skin with leathers to avoid spatter, and slag burns too.




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Last edited by McGuiver; 06-18-2019 at 6:37 PM..
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  #71  
Old 06-18-2019, 8:02 PM
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Originally Posted by MO-bound View Post
Recently got the TIG kit and been practicing. Kinda like rubbing your head, patting your tummy, and hopping on one foot at the same time. LOL.
You would not BELIEVE how skilled I am punching holes in sheet aluminum with a TIG torch.
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  #72  
Old 06-19-2019, 12:26 AM
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I used to stack dimes
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File Type: jpg weld8-17 171.jpg (89.0 KB, 43 views)
File Type: jpg weld 8-17 170.jpg (89.7 KB, 38 views)
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  #73  
Old 06-19-2019, 8:00 AM
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Yeah, that's great for automotive quality welders, but most of us non-professional hacks can satisfy ourselves with drag rod, and feeling happy when we get clean slag release without inclusions in the weld and no spatter all over the place.
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Old 06-19-2019, 12:38 PM
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I used to stack dimes
dude that is amazing work
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Old 06-19-2019, 1:51 PM
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I used to stack dimes
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Old 06-19-2019, 3:59 PM
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All done! I saw in a vid where you slide in a bolt at the base to hold the tree from moving around inside the square tubing but this fits snug enough were i dont believe its needed. One issue i found is that the angle irons (legs) are uneven. the right leg is curved upwards 2 inches idk how that could be when i welded them they were both flat on the floor. I guess i can level it out with some sort of spacer (piece of wood or 2" bolt drilled into the leg at the front).

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Old 06-19-2019, 4:09 PM
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You have experienced a little distortion created from the welding, or it was not fit-up correctly prior to welding. Not really a big deal, slide a piece of pipe over both legs and twist them in opposite direction to straighten them, If you have a oxy torch, apply a little heat prior to bending at the welds. I would also suggest that you drill some holes in the angle iron "legs", and run down to Big 5 and purchase some tent stakes, or, run over to Home Depot and purchase some very large nails to drive through these drilled holes to secure your stand to the ground.

Most important - looks great, go shoot it
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Old 06-19-2019, 4:12 PM
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I just looked at the picture again, you have welded or assembled this incorrectly, when your shot strike the "paddles" your stand will try to flip backwards - you need your longer legs facing toward the rear for support. Opposite of what you know shown have.
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Old 06-19-2019, 4:16 PM
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I just looked at the picture again, you have welded or assembled this incorrectly, when your shot strike the "paddles" your stand will try to flip backwards - you need your longer legs facing toward the rear for support. Opposite of what you know shown have.
Its tilted towards the longer leg side, i know you cant see it in the pic but its there (tilted towards you in the pic).
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Old 06-19-2019, 7:24 PM
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One issue i found is that the angle irons (legs) are uneven. the right leg is curved upwards 2 inches idk how that could be
Very nice!
Your distortion is caused because the molten metal is expanded, and it shrinks as it cools. In the future, you can manage this by tack welding at different ends, then doing a finish pass. But does it matter? How often are you setting up targets on a flat, level surface?

Take it out and turn that pretty workmanship into ugly gray!
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