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Technology and Internet Emerging and current tech related issues. Internet, DRM, IP, and other technology related discussions.

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  #41  
Old 11-27-2019, 8:45 AM
automaton1 automaton1 is online now
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Originally Posted by InFamous20 View Post
EE major.
You mentioned you're an EE, and that you're looking to make more money now, however, if you're willing to suffer more now to enjoy later consider this: Since you already have an interest in technology, have you considered double majoring in EE/CS? It would be a grueling process, and would likely take you longer, but if you survive that you'll be gritty as hell and poised to rake in the dollars. Having both the hardware and software expertise is super valuable for designing embedded devices, chip design, graphics etc and would open up doors to top-paying venues for you virtually anywhere. If you're putting full-time effort into your studies, you can max out on federal subsidized student loans. Once you finish and get a real job you should be able to pay it off rapidly.
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  #42  
Old 11-27-2019, 11:11 AM
sigstroker sigstroker is online now
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Originally Posted by ibanezfoo View Post
Thats a good point. It depends on your company but if I work after hours a lot of times I'll come in later the next day just to balance it out. I'm on salary so I don't get paid for OT. I wouldn't stay at a job where you were expected to come in bright and early and then tons of after hours work. Every once in a while is fine, for big infrastructure upgrades and such, but not all the time. Find a company that recognizes the importance of family. The last company I worked for I put in crazy hours, and often. 7am -> 3am sometimes. But, at that company I was the highest paid hourly employee. They kept fighting to put me on salary so they could take advantage of me. I always refused. If I am working I am getting paid. I'm not working 80 hours for a 40 hour paycheck.

That right there is why I will do my best to never work for a big tech company that just grinds you up and spits you out or a consultant company which just treats you like a spreadsheet number. Most of our IT team now went through the grinder at Dell, and one at Google.
I wanted to mention the hours because someone coming in from outside the IT world might not have any idea. If you're the type of person where the wife wants you home every night at 6 or you LOVE to go clubbing every Friday night, this may not be the best career for you. There's a reason the field is filled with geeks.

As for working in Big Tech, sometimes that's better because there are more people in your department to spread the load on. At the interview it's best if you can talk to one or two current employees and ask them a little about working there.
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  #43  
Old 11-27-2019, 1:10 PM
mend0k mend0k is offline
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@op, do your research on the different paths/specialization and figure out which suits your personality best. I started as support/admin but soon will be moving into a full dev role as its more enjoyable to me.

Also depending on what you want/how fast you want to learn/how stressed you want to be should dictate if you want to work for a big company or a small one.


I got into a small one where I was basically the only real "IT" guy as my boss and my other co-worker were software engineers. And basically all issues/non-major decisions fell to me from the get go (support, administering, managing, keeping everything up to date, deployment etc...). And though I was able to learn in abundance due to this, I had no one to really turn to when I was "stuck". Brute force and googling saved me countless of times.

On the other side my friend was employed by a healthcare company and was "eased" into things more so and had people to turn to when he was stuck.
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  #44  
Old 11-27-2019, 5:33 PM
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MrFancyPants MrFancyPants is offline
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Originally Posted by sigstroker View Post
Just realize that sys admins seldom work just 9 to 5. They often have to work off-hours, staying late and on weekends, so they don't disrupt the users. You might also have to be on-call after hours at times. Expect interview questions about your willingness to do so.
I wouldn't say it's often. Really just depends on where you work. I've been a sys admin for almost 8 years now, worked at 5 companies during that time, and with all of them after hours work has been very minimal, like the number of times I've had to work after hours at each one can be counted on one hand. Plus, a majority of sys admin tasks can be done remotely, so even if you do have to work after hours on something, it's usually possible to do it from the comfort of home.

The flip side is I have a ridiculous amount of flexibility with my schedule. I can pretty much show up when I want and leave when I want. There's some amount of "give" as an IT professional, but if you find a good company to work for, there's a whole lot of "take" you can take advantage of, especially once you get to the top of the food chain and are able to delegate most of the crap work.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

Last edited by MrFancyPants; 11-27-2019 at 5:35 PM..
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  #45  
Old 11-28-2019, 6:15 PM
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InFamous20 InFamous20 is offline
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Never considered double major. Iíll look into it.
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  #46  
Old 11-28-2019, 6:36 PM
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IsaacMc IsaacMc is offline
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Network admin
Network architect
Dats center ops eng
Dats center designer
Telecom eng
Telecom analyst
Compute system admin
Storage admin
20 years at one company doing all of the IT things lol
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  #47  
Old 12-03-2019, 7:31 PM
MikeyMike_510 MikeyMike_510 is offline
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Originally Posted by MrFancyPants View Post
I wouldn't say it's often. Really just depends on where you work. I've been a sys admin for almost 8 years now, worked at 5 companies during that time, and with all of them after hours work has been very minimal, like the number of times I've had to work after hours at each one can be counted on one hand. Plus, a majority of sys admin tasks can be done remotely, so even if you do have to work after hours on something, it's usually possible to do it from the comfort of home.

The flip side is I have a ridiculous amount of flexibility with my schedule. I can pretty much show up when I want and leave when I want. There's some amount of "give" as an IT professional, but if you find a good company to work for, there's a whole lot of "take" you can take advantage of, especially once you get to the top of the food chain and are able to delegate most of the crap work.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
That is true, depends how the team is structured. Same with me, I can basically arrive when I want and leave when I want but don't get me wrong I put in 40+ hours at times of the week which isn't mandatory, I just choose to.
As long as your work is completed efficiently.

There are times you may have to be available after-hours, again depends on the structure. If you are a senior sys admin, you may receive cases escalated at night and the on-call person would usually engage depending if it's business critical or not.

I also still go clubbing, I delegate tasks to the help desk folks.

All depends on where you work, each department is laid out differently.
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