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  #1  
Old 07-11-2019, 7:37 PM
Starslinger Starslinger is offline
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Default Reloading 10mm vs .223

I'm getting closer to purchasing reloading equipment starting with a quality progressive reloader (I've heard Dillon is a good brand.) I'd like to know if 10mm is significantly easier to reload compared to .223. 10mm is straight case, right, vs necked for .223? Would using 10mm eliminate the need to resize and trim the cases, as I've been told is necessary for rifle cartridges? I just took a free basic class on reloading and watched a couple of videos. That's all I know about reloading. Thanks for any help!
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Old 07-11-2019, 7:54 PM
pacrat pacrat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starslinger View Post
I'm getting closer to purchasing reloading equipment starting with a quality progressive reloader (I've heard Dillon is a good brand.) I'd like to know if 10mm is significantly easier to reload compared to .223. 10mm is straight case, right, vs necked for .223? Would using 10mm eliminate the need to resize and trim the cases, as I've been told is necessary for rifle cartridges? I just took a free basic class on reloading and watched a couple of videos. That's all I know about reloading. Thanks for any help!
As a straight tapered pistol case. No need to "trim" 10mm. Still need to size.

With .223 it can be a bit more complicated. Depending on type of rifle. And expectations of finished load.
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Old 07-11-2019, 9:04 PM
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10mm or any straight wall pistol (.380-.357) has way less steps and is a great place to start down the rabbit hole err reloading.
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Old 07-11-2019, 9:44 PM
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If you're going with a Dillon, start with the 10mm. Or even 9mm or 45 or 38 special. Easy and cheap enough to swap calibers once you've learned, and doing rifle stuff will only be an extra couple steps once you know the process.
Read, watch videos, read some more, and take your time until you've got it figured out.
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Old 07-11-2019, 10:32 PM
mmlook mmlook is offline
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minimum steps for pistol progressive reloading:
1. Resize, deprime
2. prime, powder drop, expand
3. bullet seat
4. bullet crimp

minimum steps for rifle reloading(lots of variation):
1. Lube cases
2. Size, deprime
3. Trim, chamfer
4. Prime, powder drop
5. bullet seat
6. Clean off case lube

lots of guys do stuff differently for rifle stuff,
pistol is all the same for progressive reloading

summary is you technically can't do all the steps for rifle reloading in one pass on a progressive press.

Maybe with a 1050, with a auto case trimmer.
or if you're loading once fired brass that's already been trimmed and chamfered on the first reload

either way is decently risky, especially if you don't case gauge 100%
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Old 07-12-2019, 4:06 AM
kramynot kramynot is offline
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To me the biggest differences between loading a straight wall handgun cartridge and 223 are:

1. The need to lube the case. For straight wall handgun you'll most likely get carbide dies so no lubing is needed. For 223 you'll need to lube and then later get that lube off. The problem is that for 223 I load in volume, not just a batch 40-50 rounds. So my normal method of hand lubing with Imperial sizing wax and the wiping off the lube doesn't work. For 223 right now I use a spray on lube and size, then I throw all the cases in the tumbler to get then lube off, then I continue: prime, charge, etc.

2. The other big difference is that with a lot of 223 brass, you have to deal with the crimped primer pockets. You'll need to take the crimp out only once, either through swaging or reaming and after that try to keep that brass separate from other 223 brass. I have an old RCBS progressive and its a pain having to stop the process because I fed a piece of brass that still has a crimped primer pocket into the press. Not sure how big of an issue this would be with a Dillon.
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Old 07-12-2019, 8:53 AM
Divernhunter Divernhunter is offline
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Get a single stage press for the rifle rounds and batch process your brass. You will always find the single stage useful even if you have a Dillon 650. I have the 650 and load pistol rounds in it. All my rifle rounds are done on a single stage. I have been loading since the 1960's and now load for about30 different cartridges on 3 single stage presses and a Dillon 650. One of the single stage presses is a dedicated 50bmg loader
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  #8  
Old 07-12-2019, 11:08 AM
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Like Divernhunter said, having both is a great way to go. I only reload for pistol cartridges, but I make the straight wall ammo on my Hornady LNL AP and the 357 Sig & 9X25 on my rockchucker.
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Old 07-12-2019, 12:55 PM
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yea case prep is much more needed with 223 you often need to also deal with crimped primer pockets either swage or ream

you may run into 10mm with crimped pockets on the newer NT primered brands i guess a good thing is you will never find loose cases in the wild so this problem is diminished

Last edited by bohoki; 07-12-2019 at 12:58 PM..
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Old 07-14-2019, 7:37 PM
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Thanks y’all. Good info.
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Old 07-26-2019, 7:51 PM
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You do have to be careful with 10mm depending on the original load and and what chamber it was fired in. The case can end up with a bulge near the rim that regular dies can't remove and requires a special push through die.


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Old 07-26-2019, 9:27 PM
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OP,
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Old 07-27-2019, 7:01 AM
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Most folks say no need to trim pistol cases, but keep a note of max case length. If you’re loading up for accurate hunting loads, having your cases uniform in length is conducive to precision. Be careful with bulged 10mm brass, if you do have a push through sizing die I’d say mark it for target load/low pressure reloading only. The web that bulged is compromised, even if the case is resized that part of the case would be thinner and work hardened than the rest of the web.
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Old 08-02-2019, 9:24 PM
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Start with a single stage and learn the process, slowly and carefully. There are a lot of little things you learn along the way that videos or books cannot teach.

It's a whole other world when it comes to reloading. Welcome to a new addiction.
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Old 09-16-2019, 11:30 AM
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As longhairchris stated, start with a single stage press and learn. You will always need a single stag press, even after you get a progressive press. I’ve reloaded for almost 50 years. Still use a single stage, better reloads.
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Old 09-22-2019, 8:06 AM
ar15robert ar15robert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longhairchris View Post
Start with a single stage and learn the process, slowly and carefully. There are a lot of little things you learn along the way that videos or books cannot teach.

It's a whole other world when it comes to reloading. Welcome to a new addiction.
Agree you can catch a mistake on a single stage and you also learn the process along the way.I load most of my ammo on a single stage still but have a dillion SDB i load my 45 on works great and is fast but 45 was the only handgun caliber i had and shot more so it make sense to buy that one for that.

Now have a 10mm but i load it on the single stage.As for ease of 10mmvs .223 theres less work with 10mm
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Old 09-26-2019, 12:26 AM
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Try a Lee turret press as a starter
10MM will be easier to learn with but .223 will not be significantly harder once you learn the ropes
Get carbide dies for that 10MM and you won't need to lube the cases.
You'll still need to lube the .223 brass even f you have the carbide dies for that caliber.
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Old 09-26-2019, 3:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmlook View Post
minimum steps for pistol progressive reloading:
1. Resize, deprime
2. prime, powder drop, expand
3. bullet seat
4. bullet crimp

minimum steps for rifle reloading(lots of variation):
1. Lube cases
2. Size, deprime
3. Trim, chamfer
4. Prime, powder drop
5. bullet seat
6. Clean off case lube

lots of guys do stuff differently for rifle stuff,
pistol is all the same for progressive reloading

summary is you technically can't do all the steps for rifle reloading in one pass on a progressive press.

Maybe with a 1050, with a auto case trimmer.
or if you're loading once fired brass that's already been trimmed and chamfered on the first reload

either way is decently risky, especially if you don't case gauge 100%

Lets not get the guy confused. You only need to trim a .223 about every 3-5 reloading at the most. Trimming before sizing is fine, the case will not grow enough for your cheep digital calipers to notice anyway. that and a rifles chamber has about .030-.050 over the listed case max length. so if you need to trim and forget it's not going to matter.
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Old 09-26-2019, 10:37 AM
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If I knew that I could have run my Dillon 550 as a single stage press, I would have never started out with a Lee turret press. Lee is fine but becomes very slow and temperamental over time. Dillon is engineered extremely well and so much easier to use too.
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Old 09-26-2019, 11:23 AM
kcstott kcstott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iMigraine View Post
If I knew that I could have run my Dillon 550 as a single stage press, I would have never started out with a Lee turret press. Lee is fine but becomes very slow and temperamental over time. Dillon is engineered extremely well and so much easier to use too.
Up until you use it so much that you need to do a PM on it. I have to tear both my machines down once a year, clean and reassemble everything to keep them running.
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Old 09-26-2019, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starslinger View Post
I'm getting closer to purchasing reloading equipment starting with a quality progressive reloader (I've heard Dillon is a good brand.) I'd like to know if 10mm is significantly easier to reload compared to .223. 10mm is straight case, right, vs necked for .223? Would using 10mm eliminate the need to resize and trim the cases, as I've been told is necessary for rifle cartridges? I just took a free basic class on reloading and watched a couple of videos. That's all I know about reloading. Thanks for any help!
223 is more steps and more tools.

with 10mm make sure of your seating depth (measure the case length now and then). There isn't the cannelure to help eyeball it. Too deep is bad. Can be too easily pushed in deeper is bad.
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  #22  
Old 09-29-2019, 2:25 PM
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I started with a Dillon 550 doing .40 and .223
While I load all of my pistol and almost all 223 on my 550, I usually load .308 and bigger rounds on the single stage.
I have caliber conversions for all of the rifle rounds, but get more precise results on the single stage and the powder charger 1500.
I say start with the Dillon as you can load pistol and load 223 on it. I started on the Dillon having never loaded before, and learned to load watching the video that Dillon made, and then started reading the forums. I also bought the powder charger and the Frankford arsenal trimmer when I bought my Dillon. Didn't need the powder charger until I got a singles stage later. I learned real quick to buy case guages for all calibers I load for, not just rifle. For pistol I buy the shooters box ones.
Once I started, I was hooked and it spiraled out of control. I find myself waking up to pee and checking the private reloading sales for deals before I can go back to sleep.
After you master jacketed loading, you will get into casting your own, sizing, powder coating them, making gas checks, etc.

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  #23  
Old 10-07-2019, 7:58 PM
Agent Clark Agent Clark is offline
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10mm is easy, and flexible. If you're wanting to go hot, you need to keep an eye on things, and maybe get a barrel with better chamber support. I have a G40 with a KKM barrel, and I've gotten 180's over 1300 easy enough. I may push it a little further when I get back to it, we'll see. Starline cases still look fine, but the primers are getting pretty flat. I love 10mm
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