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  #1  
Old 08-04-2019, 9:18 AM
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Default M&P shield slide release upgrade

I took my brand new shield to the range, and found the slide release to be extremely tough to engage - had to use both of my thumbs! Came home, researched about it, and it turns out the shield actually has a slide lock, not a slide release! Its meant to stop the slide, but youre supposed to pull the slide back, instead of pressing down the slide lock, to chamber a round after reload.
People suggested to retrain to get used to this.

Problem is, Ive already developed muscle memory with slide release, per military M9 training. And im still in the military, and no matter what people say, pushing down the slide release is faster than pulling the slide. So i dont want to retrain my body to pull the slide just for this one gun (shield).

Is there an upgrade available to convert the shield’s slide lock to a slide release? Apparently, if you wear it down too much by constantly using it as a slide release, it might wear down too much to the point that the slide wont even lock back anymore
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  #2  
Old 08-04-2019, 9:24 AM
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I've seen posts (maybe over at S&W forums) where guys lightly and carefully take some fine grit sandpaper to the slide stop and the slide to make it more functional as a slide release.

Not endorsing it (I slingshot my pistols, including the shield) - but I've seen some detailed posts / pictures on it. Haven't ever heard of an aftermarket part to produce this.
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  #3  
Old 08-04-2019, 9:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cortelli View Post
I've seen posts (maybe over at S&W forums) where guys lightly and carefully take some fine grit sandpaper to the slide stop and the slide to make it more functional as a slide release.



Not endorsing it (I slingshot my pistols, including the shield) - but I've seen some detailed posts / pictures on it. Haven't ever heard of an aftermarket part to produce this.


I’ve done exactly this to mine and have zero issues with it. It is still stiff, but now it is manageable with one thumb.


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Originally Posted by 1911Luvr View Post
I beg to differ. The full length dust cover rail makes a world of difference in the "when I run out of bullets I'm going to beat you to death with the pistol" look that causes bad guys to run in fear, and lesser men to feel inadequate. It looks just plain beastly and the extra heft up front does help manage recoil a bit better. Plus, an angel told me that when God called JMB to heaven it was to build him a full rail 1911!
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Old 08-04-2019, 9:59 AM
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Mine broke in after 500 rounds. Never had an issue. I also pull the slide and retrained myself since most guns aren't probe to drop the slide with my thumb.... at least the guns I own. P10c and a 5" M&P 2.0 in fact my 1911 doesnt like to drop with my thumb either.
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  #5  
Old 08-04-2019, 10:49 AM
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Mine was terrible when I started. Probably at day 10 of practice it got a lot better, but I'd probably say it became 100% functional after a month.

Now I can drop it no problem with just my thumb and minimal effort; even with an empty mag in.

Polish the mating surface if you want to accelerate it as others suggested above.
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  #6  
Old 08-07-2019, 11:51 AM
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I filed and polished mine after the first range trip 4 or 5 years ago. Just a light touch. Worked out great. Now I can work it with one thumb.

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Old 08-07-2019, 3:35 PM
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Polished mine as well and it drops like it should when I need it to, with one thumb.
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  #8  
Old 08-08-2019, 8:19 AM
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Dropping the slide with your thumb isn't a good idea for the gun, according to a segment on Guns & Ammo tv.

The two hosts were discussing how when they were at a gun show and saw people check out the hand guns and they would cringe every time they saw someone drop the slide with the thumb release.

It seems like a "cool" thing to do, but it isn't a good idea.
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Old 08-08-2019, 9:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rizzo View Post
Dropping the slide with your thumb isn't a good idea for the gun, according to a segment on Guns & Ammo tv.



The two hosts were discussing how when they were at a gun show and saw people check out the hand guns and they would cringe every time they saw someone drop the slide with the thumb release.



It seems like a "cool" thing to do, but it isn't a good idea.
I like having options. I should be able to release the slide with one thumb should the need arise. What if I catch a round in my off hand?

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Old 08-21-2019, 1:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rizzo View Post
Dropping the slide with your thumb isn't a good idea for the gun, according to a segment on Guns & Ammo tv.



The two hosts were discussing how when they were at a gun show and saw people check out the hand guns and they would cringe every time they saw someone drop the slide with the thumb release.



It seems like a "cool" thing to do, but it isn't a good idea.


Dropping the slide on on empty chamber is likely what made them cringe. Using a thumb to release the slide in a live round is not a problem.


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Originally Posted by 1911Luvr View Post
I beg to differ. The full length dust cover rail makes a world of difference in the "when I run out of bullets I'm going to beat you to death with the pistol" look that causes bad guys to run in fear, and lesser men to feel inadequate. It looks just plain beastly and the extra heft up front does help manage recoil a bit better. Plus, an angel told me that when God called JMB to heaven it was to build him a full rail 1911!
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  #11  
Old 08-21-2019, 2:05 PM
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It has to do with your natural thumb placement on the slide stop/release (whatever the F you wanna call it, it does the same damn thing).

If your thumb naturally places flat on the slide then you'll have problems dropping the slide. If your thumb naturally places perpendicular to the slide as in your thumb is running on the same horizontal plane as the slide stop/release (whatever the F you wanna call it, it does the same damn thing) then you'll be fine.

Real world: either retrain, deal with it, or get a different gun. That being said, it does get rather loose after thousands of rounds to the point where it barely locks back.
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Old 08-21-2019, 6:00 PM
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1st I would say don’t be absolute in your weapon manipulation. Play with big boy rules and know what you need to do to operate that weapon. No different than diagnosing a stovepipe from a double feed. Both take different actions to correct.

2nd and this is just a pet peeve of mine so take it for what it’s worth. There is no such thing as muscle memory. Muscles do not have brain cells. It’s called proprioception. As if you closed your eyes you could still touch your finger to your nose. You are aware of where your nose and finger are in comparison to the rest of you body. Compared to a baby learning to eat on its own ends up having most of the food spread across their face as they have not learned where their mouth is yet.
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  #13  
Old 08-22-2019, 9:33 AM
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During my first CCW class (about 20 years ago), the instructor was very clear abouth the method for releasing the slide. He advocated the "over hand" release rather than "slingshot" or using the thumb.

He said using the thumb was considered a "fine motor skill" and using the overhand was a "gross motor skill". Overhand is the only way I have done it since and is the only way my wife can operate and auto.

Dan
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Old 08-22-2019, 12:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bergmen View Post
During my first CCW class (about 20 years ago), the instructor was very clear abouth the method for releasing the slide. He advocated the "over hand" release rather than "slingshot" or using the thumb.

He said using the thumb was considered a "fine motor skill" and using the overhand was a "gross motor skill". Overhand is the only way I have done it since and is the only way my wife can operate and auto.

Dan

Whenever someone uses fine/gross motor skills as an argument to justify their pushed technique, I ask them "What about folks who use revolvers? That little cylinder release button is a fine motor skill, is it not?"

Their responses vary from stumbling to find an answer to, "those guys just train a lot."

Functioning a safety is a "fine motor skill" also, no? The FUD is just so bad. They've never looked at it objectively and only regurgitate the school of thought they were taught.
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Old 08-22-2019, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by code_blue View Post
Whenever someone uses fine/gross motor skills as an argument to justify their pushed technique, I ask them "What about folks who use revolvers? That little cylinder release button is a fine motor skill, is it not?"

Their responses vary from stumbling to find an answer to, "those guys just train a lot."

Functioning a safety is a "fine motor skill" also, no? The FUD is just so bad. They've never looked at it objectively and only regurgitate the school of thought they were taught.
Simply relating how I was taught. This by a retired CHP officer who was on the force for 30+ years and taught firearms training for the force.

Dan
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Old 08-22-2019, 1:02 PM
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Originally Posted by bergmen View Post
Simply relating how I was taught. This by a retired CHP officer who was on the force for 30+ years and taught firearms training for the force.

Dan

I know, my friend. I will note that POST training is antiquated and is the king of regurgitated training/information. POST is typically 3+ years behind the curve on updating their requirements to meet modern standards. He taught what was required by POST and the agency to recruits and other officers. This was during the times of picking up spent casings (fine motor skill) and putting them back into their pockets at the academy (see dead officers with brass in pockets after OIS) or using the MDC option to eject a magazine (also a fine motor skill) during a scuffle. CHP just now went to polymer framed pistols!

My point is that arguing from merit vs objectively is the incorrect approach to truly advancing the firearms world. It is a fallacy to believe that someone's job title or credentials equates to being a competent shooter or instructor. That's the same as assuming folks coming out of the military know how to shoot. They might, but probably haven't gone beyond their required quals just like LE. The individual person might, but definitely not the "crew".

Look at the instructor outside of their credentials to see if they're worth your time. 30+ years only tells me that he pass his mandated quals and basic POST updates. If I see him pop a squat to take a shot, I'm leaving the course.

Last edited by code_blue; 08-22-2019 at 1:06 PM..
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  #17  
Old 08-24-2019, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baekacaek View Post
Is there an upgrade available to convert the shield’s slide lock to a slide release? Apparently, if you wear it down too much by constantly using it as a slide release, it might wear down too much to the point that the slide wont even lock back anymore
Nope there isn't an upgrade as most serious users of the Shield don't use the Slide Lock as a slide release.

The last time I shot one, it was just as easy to come over the top of the slide to rack it...like you would when clearing a stovepipe jam.

I have to admit that after I bought my first M&P9 that it took me a while, a couple of years, to realize that the slide lock was difficult to release. Every time I inserted a full magazine, the inertia would cause the slide to chamber a round...made it very convenient in competition
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  #18  
Old 08-24-2019, 1:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baekacaek View Post
Is there an upgrade available to convert the shield’s slide lock to a slide release? Apparently, if you wear it down too much by constantly using it as a slide release, it might wear down too much to the point that the slide wont even lock back anymore
That can very defintiely happen. I have a friend that had a .380 auto (brand and model escape me at the moment) who used the slide lock as a slide release. Over the years, the slide would not lock open because it was worn and rounded.

Dan
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Old 08-24-2019, 6:31 PM
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The big incident that was talked about for years with dead officers having brass in their pockets was proven false years later. They looked at the case photos and along witg other evidence the photos showed officers brass on the ground. Shortly after the incident a big LE agency changed their training. Many people believed that it was because of that case, but it actually wasn't.
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Old 08-24-2019, 8:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bergmen View Post

He said using the thumb was considered a "fine motor skill" and using the overhand was a "gross motor skill".
This is a myth frequently repeated by instructors who frankly need to get out more.

Google "fine vs gross motorskills", ignore all the gun related links, read only the ones written by health care professionals.

This description of fine vs gross motorskills is what you'll overwhelmingly find.

https://youtu.be/l93BTYyHG0c
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